The Quietly Brilliant Story of HTC

This evening I followed a link to YouTube from a retweet from James Kendrick. It’s a video from HTC that shows a time line of their innovation. I somehow missed this one during my 6 months off. Don’t laugh at some of the devices shown in the video, I know some of you had them and so did I. I still have the iPAQ and had a few others shown in the early time line.

Are there HTC made devices in this photo?

I am very fond of HTC and look at them as one of my own children. I have watched them grow up fast. I remember when they broke off their partnership with i-mate and set forth to bring their designs to the people under their own name. When HTC first started hitting US carriers with their phones, the carriers branded the HTC phones with their own names. Somewhere between the AT&T Tilt (3 years ago already) and the HTC Tilt 2, HTC started a branding campaign to get their name out there. Did you know that the Dell Axim X50/X51 was designed by HTC? The X51v was my favorite Pocket PC of all time too.

What was your 1st HTC device?

Comments

  1. Steven says

    My wife is still using our first – HTC 3125. I used it and the Tilt. I really like HTC, also, but either they or their partners seem to set the price a little too high for my taste.

  2. GoodThings2Life says

    I never even owned a cellphone until I bought the Sprint Mogul (HTC PPC6800). Loved it aside from them skimping on memory, so I upgraded to the Touch Pro, which I hated, so I upgraded to the Touch Pro 2 which I loved entirely, and now I’m using the EVO which I thoroughly enjoy from a hardware point of view but not so much the Android software.

    I can’t wait to get my hands on a Windows Phone 7 device on Sprint… I know it won’t be until next year, but I’m still excited.

  3. Anonymous says

    The first HTC device I’m sure I owned was the HTC Colorado, which you all would probably know better as the Dell Axim X50v.But then I moved over to the HTC Roadster-the HP iPAQ hx4700-due to its screen and realizing that the X50v didn’t really make for all that great of a gaming device in the end (poor control layout, most of what I was running were emulators anyway), as well as a much inferior screen that was apparently a TN panel with even greater sensitivity to vertical viewing angles than any other TN panel I’ve seen.My next device was originally going to be an HTC Universal (no fixed name; that’s one of the endlessly carrier-rebranded models bearing names like “O2 XDA Exec” and “T-Mobile MDA Pro”) HTC Rhodium W (Touch Pro2 CDMA), but now with all this other hardware like the Sprint Epic 4G (Samsung Galaxy S with a slide-out thumbboard) out, I don’t know what I’ll be upgrading to.That said, I am rather irritated at HTC for having way too many underpowered, small-QVGA-screened, overpriced smartphones that couldn’t hold a candle to the otherwise-phoneless X50v/X51v, hx4700, LOOX 720 and N560, and other such devices from the 2004 PDA period up ’til around 2008, when they started playing catch-up when a certain bitten fruit corporation went into the fray a year earlier and shook things up. For every HTC Universal or HTC Athena (HTC Advantage), there were about ten other Windows Mobile devices that suggested to me that WM on the hardware front had not just stagnated, but REGRESSED.

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