Verizon’s New Push Email Apps Make Feature Phones Smarter

For those still clinging to their “dumb” phones, otherwise called feature phones, Verizon Wireless has just released a new email application for those high-end non-smartphone devices to make them just a bit smarter and bring them even closer to smartphone territory. Given that most feature phones are already crossing paths with smartphones–many are offering carrier app stores for game downloads, calendar and email capabilities, Exchange support, and other smartphone or high-end features–the new Verizon-branded email app will make these non-smartphones an even more attractive choice for corporate users who may not want to be saddled down by a BlackBerry or enterprise-issued phone.

The company’s press release mentions a number of new features, such as true push email, Microsoft Exchange integration for synchronizing corporate inboxes as well as calendars and contacts, and a fresh user interface. The app, called Mobile Email 4.0, highlights these features:


· Advantage of True Push Experience: E-mails are automatically pushed to customers’ devices, meaning customers stay on top of all their e-mails without needing to refresh.

· Microsoft® Exchange Email: Integration with personal and corporate e-mail on a single device, including aggregated personal and work contacts. Customers have all of their contacts in one place to stay connected to everyone.

· New User Interface: Provides customers with a fully redesigned interface, including a sleek new look and easy navigation. Users will also be able to upload attachments from their My Pix folder or memory card, allowing them to share moments with family and friends wherever they are.

· Outlook® Calendar Sync: Customers can balance their personal and business schedule since they can keep track of all appointments in a single device.

The app is free for users on the $15 or higher data package and will cost a $5 per month charge for users on the Pay as You Go data option. Additional details about the app can be obtained from

Via: Engadget