Fujitsu Windows Phone 7 Handset Gets Dissected by Eager Hopefuls

After having shown off an un-released Fujitsu Windows Phone 7 handset alongside three other devices running the Mango software update for the platform, eager hopefuls have begun to analyze and dissect the phone to uncover a few tidbits.

The waterproof front smartphone, shown in a rubbery magenta shell, is said to possess a relatively smaller touchscreen display at around 3.8- to 4-inch. Interestingly, though, Fujitsu chose instead to go with a traditional LCD panel display, rather than an AMOLED-based display. When Microsoft had unveiled its strategic plans for Windows Phone 7 at the MIX conference and GDC late last year, company engineers that I had spoken with told me that they were guiding handset manufacturers towards the AMOLED route.

The reason that AMOLED screens were and are preferred is due to the UI of the Windows Phone 7 Metro home screen with the live tiles. If you see, you’ll notice that there are black bands–one running up the right edge and one running along the top edge. An AMOLED-based display, where black pixels don’t need to be lit up, would be more power-friendly, and thus Microsoft’s guidance for that technology with Windows Phone 7; in contrast, LCD displays require backlighting so even the black portions get lit up.

Additionally, eagle-eyed followers of the Japanese handset noticed that the three navigation buttons–Windows, search, and back–are hardware buttons rather than capacitive touch buttons like on rival handsets. This will boil down to personal preference as users won’t accidentally activate the buttons while holding the phone, but it will take some effort if you’re pushing buttons constantly to multitask.

Additionally, an icon was noticed on one of the live tiles, and users have deduced that it’s for the Navitime GPS system, which is a third-party service for turn-by-turn GPS guidance. On Windows Phone 7, Bing Maps does not yet offer voice guided directions, and that area will get filled by Nokia Maps in the future. For now, users either have to rely on third-party solutions, or in the case of this waterproof number from Fujitsu, rely on the foresight of manufacturers.

Via: WMPU via Nanopho.jp

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Comments

  1. Dxpforr says

    ” This will boil down to personal preference as users won’t accidentally activate the buttons while holding the phone, but it will take some effort if you’re pushing buttons constantly to multitask.”
    how lazy does one person have to be, for them to notice, the difference between pushing buttons. HONESTLY STOP BEING SO FAT!

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