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HTC Plans 8 New Smartphones for Fall

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In its record-breaking earnings call, Android and Windows Phone 7 smartphone manufacturer HTC had revealed its ambitious plan to release 8 new smartphones in the third quarter in an effort to break its second quarter earnings. The company had released a number of popular flagship devices in Q2, like the HTC Thunderbolt, HTC Sensation 4G, HTC EVO 3D, HTC EVO View 4G, and HTC Flyer, and it will have to improve upon its lineup with new device models if it intends to outdo itself.

There are already a number of HTC devices rumored to be forthcoming in the company’s pipelines, including a number of second-generation Windows Phone 7 handsets, an updated HTC Thunderbolt codenamed the HTC Vigor that will take advantage of Verizon’s 4G LTE network, and the HTC Puccini tablet as a 10-inch variant of the HTC Flyer for AT&T’s 4G network.

Just for comparison, rival smartphone manufacturer Samsung releases a smartphone every 15 days historically.

Via: The Droid Guy

Tech enthusiast in Silicon Valley enjoying the possibilities of ubiquitous connectivity, information sharing, and collaboration enabled by mobile broadband. You can contact Chuong on Twitter @chuongvision or search +chuongvision on Google+.

2 Comments

  1. Anonymous

    08/08/2011 at 1:41 pm

    It’s the summer of ’78 again on Washington’s silver screen. The Obama Administration and Congress just forged a deal to trim spending and raise the debt ceiling. All eyes are on the formation of a joint committee designed to target even deeper cuts this fall. And everyone is back frolicking on the beaches and splashing in the surf, thinking it’s safe enough to go back in the water.

    Until the killer shark returned.

    You could almost hear the chilling Jaws theme by John Williams playing in the background.

    The shark returned to the lagoon off Washington’s coastline in the form of a credit downgrade from Standard & Poor’s. S&P knocked down the U.S.’s credit worthiness from the stellar category of AAA to AA+. In its report, S&P indicated that “difficulties in bridging the gulf between political parties” was a key reason it stripped the feds of a AAA rating for the first time since 1917.

    In essence, S&P didn’t think the deal was enough “to stabilize the government’s medium-term debt dynamics.”

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