Unlimited Kids Content Hits Kindle Fire & Fire HD, No In App Purchases

Today Amazon announced a new subscription for unlimited children’s content for Kindle Fire and Kindle Fire HD users that contains no in-app purchases or advertising.

The new service, called Kindle FreeTime Unlimited is a per-month subscription that gives users access to unlimited books, games, movies, TV shows, and educational apps for kids.

The service costs $4.99 per month for each individual child or $9.99 per month for an entire family for users without Amazon Prime. Users with Amazon prime pay $2.99 per child or $6.99 for a family each month.

Kinde FreeTime Unlimited includes content from Disney, Marvel, DC Comics, McNeel Publishing, Reading Rainbow, Sesame Workshop, PBS, Nickelodeon, HIT Entertainment, and many others.

Read: Kindle Fire vs. Kindle Fire HD

Amazon Kindle FreeTime

Amazon sorts FreeTime Unlimited by age and gender, though children can likely view all the content in the service no matter their age or gender. Parents can approve titles for their children, so there’s never a fear that they’ll find something potentially harmful.

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To make Kindle FreeTime Unlimited friendlier to kids and parents Amazon removes all the in-app purchases, advertisements, and social media aspects in every app and game. That means kids won’t accidentally buy extra levels in games like Where’s My Water? and Angry Birds.

Read: Best Tablets for Kids

To select the apps, games, books, movies, and TV shows available to kids Amazon partnered with Common Sense Media, a nonprofit that rates media to help parents determine if its right for their kids. Many of Common Sense Media’s top rated choices are part of Amazon’s Kindle FreeTime Unlimited.

As an optional extension of the FreeTime feature in new Kindle Fire devices parents can still limit the amount of time children can spend on individual tasks on the tablet. Parents can limit the amount of time kids spend playing games as opposed to reading books or watching TV shows. The service opens a lot of content to kids, but parents still have the final say on what their kids can do with the Kindle Fire.

  

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