Creators Confirm Beats Music, Say It’s Coming In January

It appears that Beats Music is a real thing, and it’s coming to users this January.

At least that’s according to a new BeatsMusic website and the information posted to the personal blog of Beats Music CEO Ian Rogers.

As is typical with online services these days, BeatsMusic is attempting to build excitement for its coming launch by allowing users to get in on a bit of the action now. Starting today, potential subscribers can reserve their username for the upcoming service. That isn’t to say that they can actually do anything once they’ve reserved that name.

In fact, neither the Beats Music website nor Rogers’ blog post actually talk about why users might want to choose their service over rivals from Microsoft, Apple, Google and Spotify.

beats music

Roger’s Blog post does confirm a few things. First, the music service the company is working on is already in a private beta. Users in the United States can expect that service to launch January 2014. The blog post also confirms that Beats Music’s launch was delayed so that the company could focus on “getting Beats Music right rather than pushing it out the door.”

Rogers and Beats Music seem to be focusing on the experience of music lovers first. Rogers’ blog post says that it’s testing the service with “artists and influencers” so that it can gauge their reactions and get some early feedback on the Beats Music experience.

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Unfortunately for Beats Music, the entire music industry isn’t sitting back and waiting for it to deliver its product. In the past year Google released its own subscription music service, Google Play Music All Access. Even Apple, a bastion of the traditional pay-per-song sales model thanks to the iTunes Store, released its own subscription music service called iTunes Radio. Meanwhile, industry stalwarts like Spotify, Rhapsody and Rdio have continued to add to their music streaming catalogues.

On the other hand, this is a music service from the same group of people who managed to conquer the high-end headphones market with vibrant colors and sometimes garish designs. As it has convinced millions of users to pay upwards of $100 for its earbuds and headphones, it clearly knows its target audience.

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