Nexus Android 5.0.1 Problems: 5 Things You Need to Know

Google’s new Android 5.0.1 Lollipop update for Nexus 4, Nexus 10, Nexus 7, and Nexus 9 offers a number of bug fixes for Android 5.0 Lollipop problems. It also appears to deliver some problems of its own and here, we take a look at five things you need to know, right now, about Nexus Android 5.0.1 Lollipop problems in the aftermath of the update’s release.

Earlier this month, Google released another Nexus Android 5.0 Lollipop update into the Android Open Source Project. That update is Android 5.0.1 Lollipop, a follow up to the Android 5.0 Lollipop update that deployed in November and an update that is aimed at squashing some of the bugs that arrived on the original Android 5.0 Lollipop update.


Android 5.0.1 Lollipop is a small bug fix update that’s currently rolling out to owners of select Nexus devices including the Nexus 4, Nexus 7, Nexus 10, and Nexus 9. The update’s goal is to shore up the experiences on these devices and stabilize them as we head into the new year.

While Nexus users are pleased with Android 5.0’s new features and the bug fixes found on Android 5.0.1 Lollipop, others are peeved about their latest Android upgrade.



Nexus Android 5.0 Lollipop problems have been surfacing over the last couple of weeks as Nexus users deal with an assortment of issues ranging from battery drain to Wi-Fi problems to issues with corporate email. Unsurprisingly, we’re now starting to hear about some of the issues plaguing the Android 5.0.1 Lollipop update as well. There’s been quite a bit of chatter about Nexus Lollipop problems and today, we want to sift through that noise and offer you a glimpse at the most important things to know.


This roundup will walk you through what you need to know about these problems, what you can do to prevent Nexus Android 5.0.1 Lollipop problems and what you need to know about Android 5.0 Lollipop’s future.

Android 5.0.1 Problems Plague Nexus Users

The first thing you need to know is that Android 5.0.1 Lollipop problems have started to plague owners of Nexus devices. We aren’t seeing the same type of volume we saw from the Android 5.0 Lollipop update but there are reasons for that. One being that the software still hasn’t landed for every single Nexus owner out there. It’s still very limited. While the complaints aren’t as loud, there are complaints nonetheless and it appears that Android 5.0.1 not only brings some new issues but fails to fix lingering Android 5.0 Lollipop problems.

Over the past few days, Google’s Nexus Help Forums have started to see their fair share of complaints from owners of the Nexus 4, Nexus 7, Nexus 10, and Nexus 9. We haven’t noticed any system wide bugs and most of the Android 5.0.1 problems that we’re seeing, so far, are both small and isolated. Still, there do appear to be problems.

Nexus 4 Android L System Image MIA


Users are complaining about the inability to connect to wireless at work, screen rotation issues on the Nexus 7, various issues with Wi-Fi after installing Android 5.0.1, Android 5.0.1 installation issues, problems with Google’s “OK Google” function, even more Wi-Fi problems, issues with sound after upgrading, Bluetooth issues, problems with the home button, and we’ve also heard that some people have seen the notification, only to see it disappear. This just scrapes the surface and as time goes on, we’ll almost certainly see more complaints from Android 5.0.1 users.

We don’t point these out to be annoying or mean, we point these out because you’re going to want to take stock of these issues before you install the Android 5.0.1 update on your Nexus device or devices. If you’re experiencing relative calm on Android 5.0 or below, you simply want to wait a few days to see if more problems pop up. Minor issues will always emerge but it’s the major issues that you should be worried about. So far, we haven’t seen any and we haven’t run into any ourselves.

Not Everyone Is Dealing With Problems

You should know thought that not everyone is dealing with Android 5.0.1 bugs, at least not yet. We’ve heard from numerous Nexus users, of all shapes and sizes, who claim that Android 5.0.1 Lollipop is treating their device well. Our Android 5.0.1 experience on the Nexus 7 2013 has been outstanding and its performing well in key areas like battery life, Wi-Fi, and overall speed.

We’re also seeing Nexus users provide some positive feedback about Android 5.0.1 Lollipop on Google’s forums. This isn’t unheard of but it’s nice to see some positive news in a sea of negativity. It makes sense. This is a small update that comes with a bunch of bug fixes for major, and minor, Android 5.0 problems on Nexus smartphones and tablets. It’s supposed to have a positive impact on Android 5.0.



Again, you’ll want to do your research before diving in with the Android 5.0 Lollipop update or the Android 5.0.1 update if you already have Android 5.0. Ask around, find a forum and gather feedback, and find a place that offers fixes should you run into Android 5.0.1 bugs after installing. Yes, there are issues but many of you are going to come out of the Android 5.0 Lollipop process unscathed like we did. It just takes a little bit of effort.

Fixes for Nexus Android 5.0.1 Problems

You should know that there are some potential fixes for some of these bugs. If you head to the Nexus Help Forum, you’re going to encounter a series of threads dealing with Android 5.0 issues. Many of those threads contain potential fixes for your device. We’ve discovered a number of possible fixes on there over the years and they’re a great place to start.

We’ve also put together a list of common Android 5.0 problems along with fixes for those problems. Now, keep in mind, those fixes aren’t guaranteed to work for your Android 5.0.1 issues but there’s always a chance that they’ll work or at least get you heading in the right direction. They’ve worked for some people but Android bugs can be very tricky buggers.

You Have Options

Those of you that haven’t upgraded need to remember that you have options should you run into Android 5.0.1 problems. First of all, you can skip the installation. You do not need to install Android 5.0.1 Lollipop right now if you’re feeling at all nervous about encountering some of these issues. Those of you on older devices like the Nexus 4 will want to consider holding off for the time being, at least until you can get more prepared. Older devices typically run into the most trouble.



If you do decide to take the plunge, and you run into issues, you can always flash to another piece of software or a more stable ROM out there in the development community. It’s the gift and the curse of the Nexus program. You’re a guinea pig for Google’s new Android features but you also have access to an unlocked bootloader and proper files so that you don’t have to sit around and suffer on Android 5.0.1 if you don’t want to. Yes, it’s going to take a bit of work and research but you have options if Android 5.0.1 isn’t working out for you.

Android 5.0.2 Update MIA

Finally, you Nexus users need to know that you’re most likely going to need to rely on these options and temporary fixes for the time being. Google hasn’t announced an Android 5.0.2 update and very rarely do we see Google roll out two big bug fix updates in close proximity to each other. When that happens, the second update is usually a quick fix for something on board, not a massive release.


So what that means is that we probably won’t see an Android 5.0.2 update until next year, if we see one at all. Google typically does not tip its hand when it comes to the release of smaller bug fix updates so those of you dealing with Android 5.0.1 problems will have to be extremely proactive in the hours, days and weeks ahead.

If problems persist, Google will roll out another update, but just remember that nothing is guaranteed.