Nexus 5 Android 5.0.1 Update: What You Need to Know

Yesterday, Google finally pushed the Nexus 5 Android 5.0.1 Lollipop update live. The Android 5.0.1 update comes just a few weeks after Google’s initial Lollipop release and it’s poised to fix some of the initial Android 5.0 problems that emerged for Nexus users. With the roll out now in bloom, we want to take a look at what you need to know, right now, about the Nexus 5 Android 5.0.1 Lollipop update.

In November, Google finally delivered the Android 5.0 Lollipop update that it had introduced all the way back at Google I/O in June. As expected, the Android 5.0 Lollipop update delivered a number of new features, tweaks and enhancements to owners of Google’s Nexus smartphones and tablets including the all new Material Design. Android 5.0 is Google’s biggest Android update in years and an update that was installed by many Nexus users.


In the weeks after the initial Nexus Android 5.0 Lollipop release, we started to hear more about Google’s new update. And while a lot of the chatter amongst Nexus users was good, we also heard about some of the Android 5.0 Lollipop problems affecting various Nexus users.

In particular, Nexus 5 users were extremely vocal and owners complained about a multitude of issues including battery drain, strange lag, random reboots, and more. Many users started calling for an Android 5.0.1 bug fixer and earlier this month, Google delivered.



Android 5.0.1 was initially released for the Nexus 7 2013, Nexus 9, and the Nexus 10. In the days since that initial push, the Android 5.0.1 update has landed for several other Nexus devices including the Nexus 5. The update appeared on our radar a short time ago and yesterday, Google’s Nexus 5 Android 5.0.1 update started pushing out.


With Android 5.0.1 now on the minds of Nexus 5 users around the world, we want to take a look at what you need to know about Google’s brand new Android 5.0 Lollipop update.

Nexus 5 Android 5.0.1 Update

The first thing Nexus 5 users need to know is that the Android 5.0.1 Lollipop update is here. For those that have not been paying attention, Android 5.0.1 is the first update to Google’s Android 5.0 Lollipop operating system. The update does not deliver any new features but it does bring an assortment of bug fixes that Google hopes will improve performance across its Android 5.0 powered smartphones and tablets.

According to the Android 5.0.1 Lollipop change log for developers, the update isn’t all that big in terms of number of fixes. There are a few key fixes though including one that will help prevent a factory reset if the user inputs the right commands on the lock screen. That bug could potentially be fatal for those that have not made a proper backup of the files on board the device.



While the change log is small, there’s always a chance that an update like Android 5.0.1 fixes other bugs that aren’t listed on the change log itself. Battery life woes, Wi-Fi issues and Bluetooth problems are among the more popular Android bugs and occasionally, smaller bug fix updates will alleviate these issues without mentioning them amongst the fixes.

So while Android 5.0.1 is not a very big update from a size standpoint, the Nexus 5 Android 5.0.1 update could have a big impact on the performance of the device. For better or worse.

Slow OTA

The Nexus 5 Android 5.0.1 Lollipop OTA roll out process has begun but we haven’t seen the update hit too many Nexus 5 owners yet. This is indicative of Google’s typical Nexus roll out process. While some companies and carriers push out their software updates to the masses in the early goings, Google tends to slow roll its OTA updates.


Typically, its updates roll out over the course of a week or so. They’re a bit unpredictable. Nexus 5 users are encouraged to check for the update a couple of times a day. Checking for the update incessantly isn’t going to help get it there any faster.


There’s A Way to Get It Early

OTA updates are slow but thanks to Google, there is a way to get the Nexus 5 Android 5.0.1 update on board ahead of the OTA roll out. Nexus 5 users familiar with sideloading software can snag this file from Google’s servers and manually install the software right now. This file is small, 13MB in size, and it’s for those who are moving up from Android 5.0 Lollipop.

Novice Nexus 5 users are encouraged to wait for the Android 5.0.1 OTA to arrive. Sideloading often causes issues during the installation process and there’s a chance that some users will have to perform a factory reset to get the phone back to normal. Only those with prior sideloading experience should download and install the file manually.


Nexus 5 users should also avoid trying to “force” the update using the Google Framework Services “trick.” This is not a trick at all and it could potentially wreck havoc on the device. Wait for the OTA or sideload the software ahead of time.


Android 5.0.1 Problems

While Android 5.0.1 Lollipop is a bug fixer aimed at squashing Android 5.0 problems, we’ve discovered a number of complaints about the Android 5.0.1 Lollipop update itself. Most of those complaints do not come from Nexus 5 users (the roll out is still too young) but from owners of other Nexus devices like the Nexus 7, Nexus 9 and Nexus 10.

Nexus users are complaining about the inability to connect to wireless at work, screen rotation issues on the Nexus 7, various issues with Wi-Fi after installing Android 5.0.1, Android 5.0.1 installation issues, problems with Google’s “OK Google” function, even more Wi-Fi problems, issues with sound after upgrading, Bluetooth issues, problems with the home button, and we’ve also heard that some people have seen the notification, only to see it disappear.


This is just the tip of the iceberg and the list will almost certainly grow as more people install the Android 5.0.1 update. And while these problems may not impact the performance of every Nexus 5 user, there’s reason for Nexus 5 users to play it safe.

We’ve put together some steps to take ahead of the Android 5.0.1 update that should help Nexus 5 users limit Android 5.0.1 Lollipop problems.

Fixes for Android 5.0.1 Problems

We’ve also outlined some of the more common Android 5.0.1 problems that have either popped up, or will likely pop up for Nexus 5 users in the future. These fixes come from years of using Nexus smartphones and tablets and years of installing and using Nexus updates. We’ve also experienced our fair share of Nexus Android problems.


These fixes for Android 5.0.1 problems aren’t guaranteed to work but they are a good point of reference for those that either have the Android 5.0.1 update on board already or are thinking about installing the Android 5.0.1 Lollipop update and its bug fixes in the near future. Those that stumble into more isolated issues will need to depend on fellow Nexus users, and perhaps Google, for fixes.