How to Keep Your iPhone Battery in Good Health

There are all sorts of tips and tricks on how to get the best iPhone battery life so that you can get as much life out it as you can before recharging, but what about keeping your battery healthy overall?

Over time, your iPhone’s battery degrades, which means that it won’t be able to hold as much of a charge as it used to after a couple years of usage. Some batteries degrade faster or slower than others, but usually iPhone batteries start to show signs of degradation after a couple of years and eventually they’ll be so warn out that they’ll barely be able to hold a charge at all.

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Eventually, every iPhone battery will reach this stage in its life, but with some extra care, you can make sure your iPhone battery lasts longer before it eventually needs to be replaced.

There are a lot of myths that go around about iPhone batteries and how you need to charge them a certain way in order to keep the battery healthy, but some of them aren’t entirely true, and the things people say that can be bad for your battery aren’t actually bad for it to begin with.

iPhone-6 copy

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So if you’re interested in keeping your iPhone’s battery healthy for as long as possible, here’s what you need to know about taking care of your iPhone’s battery long-term and keep it in good health.

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Avoid Extreme Temperatures

This might seem like an obvious tip, but it always bears repeating. Don’t subject your iPhone to extreme temperatures, either hot or cold.

Heat is bad for any kind of battery, and so are cold temperatures, so it’s best to keep your iPhone at room temperature as much as you can.

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Apple recommends keeping your iPhone in temperatures ranging between 32 degrees Fahrenheit and 95 degrees Fahrenheit to prevent permanent damage to your iPhone’s battery. Of course, these are the minimum and maximum temperatures, with the sweet spot being right in the middle.

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However, that sweet spot is roughly 64 degrees, so technically room temperature is still a bit too hot for an iPhone battery, but that’s something that the user can’t really control.

Keep Your iPhone Battery Topped Off

In short, it’s actually worse for your iPhone’s battery if you constantly run it down to 0% and then recharge it to 100%. Instead, it’s better to fully recharge your iPhone when it gets down to around 75% or so, but a good rule of thumb is to keep it above 50% as much as possible.

iPhone-charger

This is because your iPhone’s battery doesn’t act too kindly to a deep discharge, and it will degrade the battery’s health quicker this way.

However, you can completely discharge the battery every couple of months or so, running it down to 0% and charging it all the way back up to 100% in order to calibrate the battery. Calibrating makes sure that your iPhone displays the correct battery percentage on the screen.

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Should You Leave Your iPhone Plugged In?

Once your iPhone reaches 100% should you immediately unplug it, or can you leave it plugged in for an extended amount of time?

This is a question that most people will answer differently. Many users argue that it’s bad for your iPhone’s battery to leave the device plugged in for an extended amount of time after it’s fully charged, since “trickle charging” slowly counts toward your iPhone’s total cycles, and since batteries only have a set amount of cycles they can go through before they permanently die, leaving your iPhone plugged in may not be a great idea. Plus, there’s also the heat issue.

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iPhone-6

As for trickle charging, this is when your iPhone’s charger will give your iPhone an ever-so-slight charge in order to keep it at 100% the whole time that you have it plugged in. In other words, when you keep your iPhone plugged in after it has charged to 100%, it’s essentially going back and forth between 99% and 100% until you finally unplug it.

Popular Mechanics says that leaving your iPhone “plugged in all the time is not bad for its battery,” while Gizmodo says that “leaving it plugged when it’s already full is going to cause a little degradation.”

So what can you do? For starters, don’t sweat it too much. If you leave your iPhone plugged in overnight, there’s probably nothing to worry about. However, if you plug in your iPhone and accidentally leave it plugged in while you go on a two-week vacation, it’s possible that it could degrade the battery somewhat.

Stay Away from Quick Charging

A lot of iPhone users like using iPad chargers to charge their iPhones because the extra wattage and amperage will charge it up quicker than the regular iPhone charger can, and that’s true.

There are also those quick-charge chargers that you can buy that will give your smartphone a quick boost of battery life in a matter of minutes, which seems great, but it’s not the best idea.

Fast-charger

According to Battery University, your iPhone’s battery can live longer when it’s charged using a slower charge rate, especially one that your iPhone is equipped to handle adequately and properly.

Sure, you can use the iPad charger every once in a while to quick-charge your iPhone when you need it the most, but it’s not recommended to use it all the time.