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Resistive vs. Capacitive: Inking Video Demo

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Long time Tablet PC user Maraderz has shared via YouTube a demonstration of the ink-friendliness of the Fujitsu UH900 with resistive touchscreen vs. the Lenovo S10-3T with capacitive touchscreen. Both have their advantages, but for inking, the winner is clear (and both would get their pens handed to them by an active digitizer).

Via UMPCPortal

Alleged Apple fanboi, accused Android apologist, and confirmed Microsoft MVP for touch and tablet Mark Sumimoto a.k.a. Sumocat dabbles in all areas of mobile computing with a focus on Windows-based Tablet PCs and pen input. A mobile computing enthusiast since 2004, he pioneered the field of ink blogging via his personal blog, Sumocat's Scribbles. His current tools include a Fujitsu Lifebook T900, TEGA v2, and iPhone 4. Email: sumocat [at] notebooks.com

10 Comments

  1. Antimatter

    02/25/2010 at 10:05 am

    This really dashes my hopes of being able to use a stylus with the iPad. A while back you said you were excited about it, Sumocat. Does this change that opinion?

    • Sumocat

      02/25/2010 at 10:35 am

      Not really. I’ve already anticipated and experienced the drawbacks shown here, so for me now, it’s a matter of pondering ways to overcome them.

  2. smh

    02/25/2010 at 10:31 am

    I believe that the various resistive touch technologies out there will be the future because they, unlike the capacitive technology, are not restricted to specific inputs.

    Solutions that are as thin as the human hair is already being developed (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/8504373.stm).

  3. Medic

    02/25/2010 at 10:45 am

    “Maybe I should do it like the Internet, and use a sausage”. Hahaha, lol!

  4. Jason

    02/25/2010 at 12:00 pm

    Thanks, this was very useful!
    I guess none of the new devices are for me :(

  5. jl

    02/25/2010 at 7:12 pm

    Thanks. Seriously though, this video really makes me appreciate my TC1100…

  6. Dan

    02/26/2010 at 8:53 am

    I agree! The active input on the TC1100 and my 2730P puts all this to shame! Even the resistive input on my P1620 with palm rejection technology is better than this, and even that is frsutrating beyond belief sometimes now that I am used to the active digitizer like on the TC1100 0r 2730P.

    The only thing I can think of is that the active digitizers must be very expensive and that is what is keeping them off the new devices, especially the touch screen netbook devices. Before that is given as the only explanation, however, keep in mind the list price on the Fujitsu P1620 was more than either the HP TC1100 or the HP 2730P.

    For my next device to replace my workhorse 2730P (my college student son is using my TC1100 with OneNote and loves it, and my daughter uses the P1620 as a netbook around the house) I want a slate with a 9″ screen with an active digitizer *and* multitouch. It is unfortunate that nobody seems to think this is a viable product!

    Dan

  7. slacker

    02/27/2010 at 4:29 pm

    I enjoyed this!

    I have found the P1620 to be quite hard work, harder even than the P1610 (don’t know if there was any HW difference). A Viliv S7 I’ve been using has been a good experience though. The UH-900 I ordered is going back; not the least because calibration is way out. I presume resistive touch is the most mature touch tech?

    A modern day TC1100 would be my dream tablet. TC1100 FTW!

  8. Edward Lee

    03/01/2010 at 10:09 pm

    Count me in for the 9″ to 12″ slate slate with an active digitizer and multitouch. I would also like a desktop dock so I can connect to an external monitor and keyboard and thus also use this as my primary PC at the office.

  9. Edward Lee

    03/01/2010 at 10:15 pm

    Sign me up for that modern day TC1100 as well! :-)

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