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What Will You Pay For Cable Cutting TV Viewing Services?

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So, Hulu Plus is coming out of beta today. The Internet TV viewing subscription service will be $7.99 a month down from the $9.99 monthly charge during the beta period. With many saying that cable cutting services like Hulu being the wave of the future, they will all come with a price tag of some sort. That’s not a problem, in my view, unless you think of adding them on top of your existing cable monthly bill and then things start to add up.

I know of several cable cutting pioneers who are willing to just make the snip away from cable and some already have. But I’m guessing the folks at Hulu (and others) are trying to find a price point that allows those not so willing to pull the plug to add their streaming service on top of existing coverage and not feel the hit at first.

These services are making it onto all sorts of new boxes and we’ll see more of this once the content providers figure out how to deal with the disruption. Apps are proliferating across mobile platforms and Hulu promises its Apps will be updated very soon.

While the services are the disrupters, so are you, dear consumer. So, here’s a couple of questions. Are you in the mind frame of cutting your cable TV tether? If so, what’s the monthly freight you’re comfortable paying for these type of services? Are you moving towards Roku, Apple TV, Google TV? Or is it too early to tell where this is going?

Let us know in comments.

Warner Crocker is a professional theatre director, producer and playwright and also a Tablet PC enthusiast. He is also a Microsoft MVP for Tablet PCs. Send email to Warner. You can follow him on Twitter or Google+

4 Comments

  1. Jeff

    11/17/2010 at 1:53 pm

    My Tivo 3 records more shows from over-the-air than I have time or inclination to ever watch. Why would I page $60 or more for cable, Dish, or DirecTV? If I took that money (12×60=$720/year) and bought TV shows and movies on DVD, not only would I get more shows than I have time or inclination to watch, but they’d be commercial free and I can watch them again anytime I want over the next 10 years (about how long I expect a DVD to last before it decays beyond readability).

  2. DNel

    11/17/2010 at 4:51 pm

    Over air TV here is not a choice. That leaves cable, satellite, or internet. To have broadband internet requires cable here (DSL not an option), so I won’t be cutting the cable anytime soon.

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