WebOS Will Run on Non-Tablet Computers in a Window on Windows

HP’s John Rubenstein recently appeared on the Engadget Show and clarified a bit about how webOS will run on all those non-tablet HP computers. Apparently it is going to run in a window on Microsoft Windows. I haven’t watched the video yet, but according to mobiputing, this won’t be a dual boot solution nor will your webOS apps be able to interface with Windows software outside of the webOS box. I’m guessing those are first steps.

mobiputing further links to PreCentral and info that it might also be the case that native webOS apps built with the plug-in development kit (PDK) won’t be able to run on Windows but that web apps built using HTML5 will.

Side note: When I went to watch the video of the Engadget Show I linked to the video wasn’t available. Nothing strange there as that show is a live streaming event and often live streaming events don’t show up as downloadable video until some time after the live event. But, in the great game of make believe that is advertising, I find it humorous that the pre-roll ad runs before you get to the screen that tells you the video is not available. Nice to be able to make money off of nothing. Wish I could figure out how to do that.

 

Comments

  1. $350AShareMakesMeHappy>8-D says

    I had hoped Apple would have done the same thing with OSX and iOS, that is, to have iOS running in some sort of virtual machine with OSX. I thought with so many apps being available for iOS, why not have them run on more Apple devices. However, I suppose from Apple’s standpoint, it would be cutting into the Mac App Store and those developers would lose out. It just seems pretty neat to me to be able to pull up and virtual machine window and play a few iOS games. HP certainly thinks a lot differently than Apple. HP is trying to build some unified platform for the enterprise, but Apple is more interested in selling lots of hardware and will try to keep OSX and iOS apart.

  2. Anonymous says

    I’m still excited about this. WebOS would be perfect for HP all-in-one touch screen machines. It could easily handle all of the basic stuff you do with a Windows machine and provide a unified touch experience. It’s a match made in heaven. Then if you needed to do something that only a traditional desktop OS can do, bust out with the mouse and keyboard.

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