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Wacom Unveils a Stylus for Capacitive Tablets

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Ah, the dreaded stylus. Yes, that horrible input device that actually lets you write something legible on a capacitive screen without using your fingers. We’ve covered quite a few styli here that work with the iPad and other capacitive screens, but for various reasons they all seem to leave us wanting.

Well, maybe Wacom might have an answer. What’s that? All of you Tablet PC toting geeks out there are collectively asking Wacom? Wacom is making a new stylus? Well, that’s only a natural if you think about it, given that Wacom was (and is) the preferred digitizer/pen maker for Tablet PCs, as well as the Bamboo Tablet and other peripheral drawing tablets out there.

According to recombu.com, Wacom will be releasing the Bamboo Stylus for capacitive screens in May in the UK. The stylus sports a 6mm tip and will run about $41. Word is that Wacom is releasing some stylus based Apps as well. We’ll have to follow this and see how this works.

Via Engadget

 

Warner Crocker is a professional theatre director, producer and playwright and also a Tablet PC enthusiast. He is also a Microsoft MVP for Tablet PCs. Send email to Warner. You can follow him on Twitter or Google+

7 Comments

  1. Anonymous

    04/18/2011 at 4:39 pm

    That’s a little steep for something that looks just like everything else out there.

  2. Anonymous

    04/18/2011 at 7:04 pm

    If there’s no pressure sensor behind the nib that can communicate that information over Bluetooth to the hose system, nor any means of sensing when the pen is near the screen or otherwise ready for use for palm rejection’s sake, then it’s just an overpriced capacitive stylus.

    Wacom needs to focus on pushing their active pen digitizer technology in the tablet space. They’re already losing ground to N-trig in the Android space (HTC Flyer)…

  3. Anonymous

    04/18/2011 at 7:10 pm

    I think it might have some problems.
    But I am happy to see the cause pushed forward.
    Besides, the very existence of it might lead to some solutions for those problems on a wider scale.

    I’d be quite happy with a simple system switch to choose between fingers and stylus if they could make that work to help with palm rejection.
    I don’t need no auto-sense trying to figure out what I’m doing moment to moment.

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