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Kindle for iPad Now Supports Children’s Books and Graphic Novels

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Amazon now lets iPad and Cloud Reader users read content that was previously only available to Kindle Fire  and Android users.

Today Amazon announced its iPad and Cloud Reader apps now support children’s books and graphic novels with Panel View. Now iPad and Cloud Reader users can read more graphical content on their platforms of choice.

The updates bring a number of children’s books to users with kids. The books feature large pictures to keep kids interested. The text accompanying the images are zoomable for easier reading no matter what screen their read on. Amazon’s children’s book collection ranges from Sesame Street to Freight Train and Olivia.

Unfortunately the selection is relatively small, but there are some good choices.

Graphic novels in the apps use Amazon’s Panel View like they do on the Kindle Fire. The feature makes it easy to read graphic novels panel-by-panel similar to Comixology, though arguably not as good. Amazon does have some content that Comixology doesn’t, however. Amazon has an exclusive on DC graphic novels, so it’s the only place to find full books like Watchmen, Superman: Earth One, The Sandman, and Batman: The Dark Knight Returns.

It’s strange that iPad and Cloud Reader users had to wait this long for a children’s book and graphic novel support, though it does make sense in a way. Amazon wanted to keep some features to the Kindle Fire for a period of time before bringing them to other platforms.

There were always, and still are, other apps for both types of books, so there was never a big need for Amazon to add the functionality. It is nice to have access to some of the exclusive content, however.

Shawn is a tech junkie who spends most of his time reading and writing about it. You can follow him on Twitter, @shawn_i.

1 Comment

  1. David

    01/02/2013 at 10:40 am

    It doesn’t seem to be the case that all graphic novels at Amazon can be downloaded to Kindle for iPad. I can’t download a sample of the Ender’s Game Battle School, for example. Was the policy reversed, or is it true only of a segment of graphic novels?

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