Dual-Boot Android, iOS Solution Coming to iPhone, iPad

After we had reported that Android is being ported to the Windows Mobile HTC HD2, it looks like enterprising developers are going to be bringing the latest version of Android to Apple’s current flagship iPhone 4 and iPad tablet. Android 2.2 Froyo had already made it to the iPhone 3G, and with the promised port to iPhone 4, current iOS owners will soon be able to dual-boot into the Android OS on their iDevice and get Adobe Flash support, albeit unofficially.

Developers are working to exploit the iBoot bootloader and are calling it OpeniBoot, which would allow users to choose which OS to boot into, whether it’s Android or iOS. Theoretically, OpeniBoot can be used to call up other non-sanctioned OSes to be booted up as well, so a Linux port or a MeeGo port could also be possible by utilizing the bootloader.

With Steve Jobs denouncing Adobe Flash for its taxing use of battery life on a mobile device, it’d be interesting to compare battery life on iOS versus that on the iPhone 4 running Android with Flash support.

If you own the older iPhone 3G, you can take a spin of the dual-booting solution that is available right now.

Via: Uberphones

  

Comments

  1. GoodThings2Life says

    I absolutely LOVE seeing people loading up Android on iDevices. :) Not only is it amusing to see, but it opens up all sorts of opportunity to discredit Steve Jobs’ claims about, well– anything and everything.

    Don’t get me wrong– I HATE Flash. I don’t like Adobe at all, really (I have an issue with A-named companies, apparently)… but I recognize Flash as a necessary evil for right now, and Jobs is so arrogant about “it would never work well” claims that I enjoy seeing him proven wrong.

  2. Anonymous says

    The fact still remains that whether jobs wants to believe it or not people want flash on their idevices..as a jailbreaker myself i’ve encountered many jailbreakers looking for that sole feature when i’m hacking away their device. It’s the draconian approach to not even giving us the option to use flash that bothers people..I think a consumer can make up their minds whether a codec is worth their installing or not, that’s not something that should be on their control. The funny thing is that they themselves couldn’t come up with a new video codec which other providers could block out on their devices..so that leaves all other devices with access to apple’s stuff but apple doesn’t leave that same door to all available content across the web and therein lies the true problem here.

Leave a Reply