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AT&T’s HTC One X Goes With Dual-Core Rather Than Quad-Core CPU

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AT&T confirmed that its 4G LTE version of the HTC flagship One X smartphone announced at Mobile World Congress will come with a dual-core Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 chipset rather than the quad-core Tegra 3 ‘4+1‘ CPU found on the international version. The decision to go with the dual-core Snapdragon rather than the quad-core Tegra 3 is due to technical limitations of the Tegra 3 CPU at this time as AT&T wants a fast processor that was still compatible with its growing 4G LTE network. As such, Qualcomm’s chipset is chosen.

AT&T confirmed that its 4G LTE version of the HTC flagship One X smartphone announced at Mobile World Congress will come with a dual-core Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 chipset rather than the quad-core Tegra 3 ‘4+1‘ CPU found on the international version. The decision to go with the dual-core Snapdragon rather than the quad-core Tegra 3 is due to technical limitations of the Tegra 3 CPU at this time as AT&T wants a fast processor that was still compatible with its growing 4G LTE network. As such, Qualcomm’s chipset is chosen.

The trend is rather unsurprising given that in the past, smartphone manufacturers have often times abandoned powerful CPUs found on international variants in favor of Qualcomm CPUs when placing the phones on American carriers’ HSPA+ and LTE networks. One example is Samsung’s Galaxy S II and Galaxy Note, which eschewed the Exynos CPUs when the models came to the U.S. in favor of Qualcomm’s CPU for better compatibility with T-Mobile’s HSPA+ network and AT&T’s 4G HSPA+/LTE network.

It’s still unclear at this time how Qualcomm’s dual-core implementation fares against NVIDIA’s quad-core architecture. In the past, Qualcomm had been vocal about how it’s dual-core CPUs will out-perform quad-core rival offerings, and early benchmarks of the company’s 28nm architecture S4 chipset proves that the Snapdragon S4 packs a lot of punch when compared to other dual-core offerings. That said, the benchmarks still do not reveal how performance of the S4 will be against quad-core Tegra 3.

It’s also unclear–given how much marketing and hype there is for a quad-core mobile CPU–how consumers on AT&T’s 4G LTE network will react to a dual-core offering. Unfortunately, beginning with dual-core CPUs under Tegra 3, Android manufacturers have hyped up the number of cores offered on its products, and to a certain degree, consumers have bought into the hype. In a catch 22 situation, HTC has to undo some of that hype to push Qualcomm’s S4 on AT&T’s network.

The trend is rather unsurprising given that in the past, smartphone manufacturers have often times abandoned powerful CPUs found on international variants in favor of Qualcomm CPUs when placing the phones on American carriers’ HSPA+ and LTE networks. One example is Samsung’s Galaxy S II and Galaxy Note, which eschewed the Exynos CPUs when the models came to the U.S. in favor of Qualcomm’s CPU for better compatibility with T-Mobile’s HSPA+ network and AT&T’s 4G HSPA+/LTE network.

It’s still unclear at this time how Qualcomm’s dual-core implementation fares against NVIDIA’s quad-core architecture. In the past, Qualcomm had been vocal about how it’s dual-core CPUs will out-perform quad-core rival offerings, and early benchmarks of the company’s 28nm architecture S4 chipset proves that the Snapdragon S4 packs a lot of punch when compared to other dual-core offerings. That said, the benchmarks still do not reveal how performance of the S4 will be against quad-core Tegra 3.

It’s also unclear–given how much marketing and hype there is for a quad-core mobile CPU–how consumers on AT&T’s 4G LTE network will react to a dual-core offering. Unfortunately, beginning with dual-core CPUs under Tegra 3, Android manufacturers have hyped up the number of cores offered on its products, and to a certain degree, consumers have bought into the hype. In a catch 22 situation, HTC has to undo some of that hype to push Qualcomm’s S4 on AT&T’s network.

Via: SlashGear

Tech enthusiast in Silicon Valley enjoying the possibilities of ubiquitous connectivity, information sharing, and collaboration enabled by mobile broadband. You can contact Chuong on Twitter @chuongvision or search +chuongvision on Google+.

4 Comments

  1. TheRealCBONE

    02/27/2012 at 6:33 am

    Apparently Nvidia got blindsided with that whole LTE compatibility thing. I mean, who could have seen that one coming? 

  2. longnian22

    02/28/2012 at 3:56 am

     http://lnk.co/ILKGR

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