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Save $ and win a netbook with PDF Annotator

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Grahl Software is running one deal and one contest to help you out with back-to-school expenses (even if you don’t have any). The deal is $8 off your purchase of PDF Annotator. In case you don’t know, PDF Annotator is a feature-rich application that enables you to mark up a PDF on your Tablet PC. Great for taking notes on top of a lecture syllabus or marking key points in your PDF textbook. Coupon code BACK2SCHOOL knocks the price down to $21.90.

Their contest is to win a Samsung NC10 netbook in your choice of pink or blue (and giant-sized judging from the photo, or maybe the girl is tiny). Seems an odd pairing given the NC10 lacks pen input, but it’s free to the winner, so that’s cool by me. Details after the jump.

Back-to-School with PDF Annotator: $8 Off

To help you getting started, we will have PDF Annotator Student Licenses on sale for only $21.90 until September 30. That’s $8 off!

Use coupon code BACK2SCHOOL at checkout to get the discount.

With PDF Annotator you can …

  • Take notes during lectures
  • Mark-up your text books
  • And much more, learn about it.

Hint for the grown-ups: This coupon code will also work for our regular licenses!!

Win a Netbook with PDF Annotator

Also part of our Back-to-School promotion, we get you the chance to win a slick Samsung NC10 Netbook in your color of choice!

You may want to distinguish yourself from all the others, schlepping around heavy and darn ugly laptops at school. So we don’t only get you a state-of-the-art netbook, we even give you the choice to get it in pink or in blue! Now, that was what you were looking for, right?

Be the first to enter for our Netbook, it will be given away by October 1st.

BTW, we already have bets running, if it’s going to be a blue or a pink one!

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Apple

How to Fix Bad iOS 14 Performance

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As we push away from the iOS 14 release date we’re hearing about a number of issues including a variety of performance problems impacting iPhone models.

While a lot of the feedback about iOS 14 has been great, we’ve been having a good experience across most of our devices, we’ve also been hearing about bugs and performance issues.

The current list includes UI lag, freezes, lock ups, and random reboots. These are extremely common, particularly on older iPhone models. Newer iPhones aren’t immune to them though.

Unfortunately, performance issues such as these can be tricky to fix. While you might be able to fix them on your own, some might require a fix from Apple in a new software update.

If you can’t wait and/or you don’t have time to get in touch with Apple support, we have some fixes that could help alleviate the performance issue(s) you’re seeing on your device.

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Restart Your iPhone

If you start noticing UI lag or another performance issue on your iPhone, try restarting it. Power it down, leave it off for a minute, and the turn it back on.

Update Your iPhone

Apple will periodically release new iOS 14 software. Point updates (x.x.x) are usually focused on fixing bugs while milestone upgrades (x.x) usually deliver a mix of features and fixes. And while Apple might not call out performance fixes in an update’s change log, new software always has the potential to help (or hurt) your iPhone’s overall performance.

For more on the latest version of iOS 14, take a look at our guide.

Update Your Apps

If you haven’t done so already, try updating your applications to the latest version.

App developers are currently rolling out iOS 14 support updates and they could help stabilize iOS 14’s performance on your device.

Before you install the latest version be sure to go into the App Store and read reviews from other iOS 14 users. If the reviews are mostly good, you’ll want to download the latest version.

Reset Your Settings

If you’re still not getting the kind of performance you would like, try resetting your iPhone’s settings. Here’s how to do that on iOS 14:

  • Go to Settings.
  • Tap General.
  • Tap Reset.
  • Tap Reset All Settings.
  • Enter your passcode if you have one enabled.

This will restore your iPhone’s settings to their factory defaults so be sure you have your Wi-Fi passwords handy. You’ll need to re-enter them.

Cleanup Your Storage

If you’ve had your iPhone for several years there’s a very chance you’ve got a lot of clutter taking up space on its internal storage. Deleting this clutter could help speed up your iPhone.

To start, you’ll want to check and see how much space is free on your device. Here’s how to do that:

  • Head into Settings.
  • Tap General.
  • Tap Storage & iCloud Usage.
  • Select Manage Storage.

If you’re getting close to the threshold you’ll want to head back into General and scroll to where it says iPhone Storage. Here you’ll get a detailed rundown of your data.

Apple will make some recommendations based on your utilization of your storage, but you can also just go through each section manually and delete files you don’t need.

Stop Automatic Downloads

iOS’ automatic update feature can be useful, but a constant stream of updates will make your iPhone work in the background.

If you’re alright with manually updating your applications on the App Store, try disabling Automatic Downloads on your iPhone and see if performance improves a bit.

To do this you’ll head into Settings. From there, Tap iTunes & App Store. From there you’ll want to toggle Updates, located in the Automatic Downloads section, off. You might want to toggle the other options off as well.

Disable Widgets

iOS 14 brought some big time upgrades to iOS’ Widgets. That being said, if you don’t use Widgets on your iPhone, try disabling some or all of them to see if that helps.

To do that you’ll want to swipe to the right while you’re on your iPhone’s home screen. After that, you have two options. You can:

  1. Hard press on an individual Widget
  2. Scroll all the way to bottom of the screen and select Edit. This will cause them to start wiggling.

If you hard press on a Widget, a small menu will popup. To remove a widget you’ll want to tap on Remove Widget at the top.

If you selected Edit at the bottom, you can tap the minus sign on a wiggling Widget to remove it. You can also scroll down to the bottom and select Customize. This will allow you to quickly add or subtract Widgets.

We recommend disabling Widgets you don’t use. Remember, you can always turn them back on if you don’t notice a bump in performance.

Clear Browser Cookies & Data

Clearing your browser’s cookies and data will free up memory which could have a positive impact on your phone’s performance.

If you use Apple’s Safari browser go into the Settings app, tap Safari, and scroll down to where it says Clear History and Website Data. Tap on it.

Tapping this will remove your browsing history, cookies, and other data from Safari. History will also be cleared from any devices signed into your iCloud account. If you’re fine with that, tap Clear History and Data again.

If you use Google Chrome, you’ll want to head into the app and tap the three horizontal circles in the bottom right corner. They’re in the top right corner if you haven’t updated to Chrome’s new design.

Once there, tap Settings, tap Privacy, and now tap Clear Browsing Data. You can now select what you wish to delete. If you’re noticing heavy lag, you might want to clear everything.

Stop Using Background Refresh

iOS 14’s Background App Refresh refreshes apps in the background to show you the latest data when you open them up. It also makes your phone work in the background so if you don’t need this, you might want to shut it off.

Here’s how you disable it:

  • Go into the Settings app.
  • Tap General.
  • Tap Background App Refresh.
  • At the top tap Background App Refresh and toggle it off.

If you want to keep it on for some apps, leave it on and then go down your list of apps and manually turn it off for apps you don’t use.

Downgrade

If you were having a good experience on the previous version of iOS, you could try downgrading your iPhone’s software. If you don’t know how to downgrade, have a look at our walkthrough. It’ll guide you through the steps you need to take.

Restore

If you can’t find a fix for your issue, and you want to avoid taking your phone into a store, you might want to restore your device. This should only be used as a last resort.

You can do this via Finder, iTunes, or iCloud.

4 Reasons Not to Install iOS 14 & 11 Reasons You Should

Install iOS 14 for Better Security

Install iOS 14 for Better Security

If security is important to you, think about installing the iOS 14 update right away.

iOS 14 brings 11 new security patches to your iPhone. If you're interested in the exact nature of these improvements, you can read about them over on Apple's website.

If you skipped iOS 13.7 or any older versions of iOS 13, you'll get the security patches from those updates with your iOS 14 update. 

In addition to those patches, iOS 14 comes with some security and privacy upgrades including improvements to Home/HomeKit and Safari. 

For instance in Safari, you can now tap the Privacy Report button to better understand how websites handle your privacy.

With iOS 14 on board you can now get information on the App Store that will help you understand the privacy practices of apps before you download them. 

There is also a new recording indicator that will appear at the top of your screen whenever an app is using your microphone or camera. You can see if an app has used them recently in Control Center.

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Apple

8 Things to Know About the iPhone 6s iOS 14 Update

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The iOS 14 update is out of beta testing which means iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus users around the world can now download Apple’s new operating system.

Apple’s decision to push iOS 14 to the iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus came as a bit of a surprise given their age. They were released all the way back in 2015.

The company’s decision means iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus users now have another full year of software support to look forward to. That might convince some people to skip the iPhone 12 and hold onto their aging phone for another year or more.

The iPhone 6s’ iOS 14 update is a big one. The new operating system comes with a long list of changes including new features, under-the-hood improvements, and security patches.

Many users have already made the jump to iOS 14 which means we’re starting to get feedback about the software’s performance. So far, a lot of it is good, but we’ve also heard about various bugs and performance issues.

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If you decide to install iOS 14 on your iPhone, note that it requires a ton of free space on your internal storage. It’s a 2GB+ download.

If you’re running an older version of iOS on your iPhone 6s or iPhone 6s Plus, your iOS 14 upgrade could be larger because the features and fixes from iOS updates you skipped are baked in.

With that in mind, we want to take you through the most important things to know, right now, about the iPhone 6s’ iOS 14 update.

Our walkthrough will take you through the software’s initial problems, the downgrade status, the iOS 14 jailbreak, and the iPhone 6 iOS 14 update’s performance.

We’ll start with the software’s performance. We’ve been testing iOS 14 on the iPhone 6s update for a short time and here’s what we’ve learned.

iPhone 6s iOS 14 Impressions & Performance

We recently installed the iOS 14 update on an iPhone 6s that was previous running iOS 13.7. The download and installation took quite awhile, more than 20 minutes, so that’s what you should expect if you decide to install it this week.

So far, the software’s performance has been excellent. iOS 14 feels faster than iOS 13. Animations and transitions are snappy and apps open up quickly.

While the user interface would sometimes lag on iOS 13, that hasn’t been the case on iOS 14. We haven’t noticed any lag in problem areas like Control Center, Notification Center, or the keyboard.

We’ve only been using the software for a short time, but battery life is stable. We haven’t seen any abnormal battery drain and that’s a good sign right out of the gates.

Our core applications, which include Slack, Asana, Spotify, Chrome, and Gmail, are all stable. The Netflix crashed once while trying to watch a show, but we’re not going to pin it on iOS 14 just yet.

Developers are rolling out iOS 14 support updates so if you’re having issues with one of your apps, make sure you’re running the latest version.

As of right now, iOS 14 is running smoothly on our phone. We haven’t run into any game-changing performance issues and we’ll let you know if that changes in the days ahead.

Right now we’re recommending iOS 14 to most iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus users. If you’re feeling leery, have a look at our reasons to, and not to, install iOS 14 right now.

You Should Prepare for iOS 14

If you plan to install iOS 14 in the near future, make sure you prepare yourself, and the device, for the move.

While some of you might see a performance boost after moving up from iOS 13, others will run into trouble. This is why it’s important to prepare.

If you don’t know where to start, we’ve released a pre-installation guide that will take you step-by-step through the process we typically use before we install new iOS software on our iPhones. If you’re new to the iPhone and iOS, or you just want to play it safe, it could help.

At the very least you’ll want to make sure all of your data is backed up before you move your phone to the new operating system.

iPhone 6s iOS 14 Problems

We haven’t run into any major issues during our time on iOS 14, but many users have.

The current list of iOS 14 problems includes abnormal battery drain, UI lag, issues with first and third-party apps, Touch ID issues, touchscreen problems, Exchange issues, Wi-Fi issues, Bluetooth problems, and more.

This is only the beginning. You can expect the list to grow as more iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus users upgrade to the new firmware.

If you’re nervous about the current state of iOS 14 problems, you might want to hang back and wait for Apple’s next batch of bug fixes. They should arrive soon.

How to Fix iPhone 6s iOS 14 Problems

If you run into an issue on iOS 14 you might be able to fix the problem(s) on your own.

If you don’t know where to start, our list of fixes for the most common iOS 14 problems is a great place to start.

If you’re noticing horrendous battery life after the move to iOS 14, our tips should help you improve battery life going forward. And if you’re experiencing bad performance (lag, slow download speeds, etc), take a look at our guide to fixing bad iOS performance.

iOS 13 Downgrade Open

If you move your iPhone 6s or iPhone 6s Plus to iOS 14, and you run into bugs or performance issues, you could try moving back to iOS 13.

Apple is currently signing on iOS 13.7 which means you can drop your iPhone’s software back in an attempt to improve its performance.

The company won’t sign on iOS 13 forever so if you really want to get your phone off of iOS 14, you’ll need to drop back soon. Once Apple stops signing on iOS 13.7, there won’t be a way back to the previous operating system.

If you’re unfamiliar with the downgrade process, take a look at our guide.

iPhone 6s iOS 14 Update: What’s New

The iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus get a pretty stacked version of iOS 14. While the devices do miss out on a few features, the key features are all there.

Some of the highlights include Widgets on the home screen, improvements to Messages and Maps, the new Translate app, and a laundry list of changes to Siri.

We’ve put together a guide that will take you through some of iOS 14’s best features and it’s worth a look if you haven’t dug into the new operating system yet.

If you’re moving up from an older version of iOS 13 you’ll, again, get the features and fixes from the updates you skipped. We also have a guide that goes over the latest iOS 13 features and you should check it out if you’re running old software.

What’s Next for the iPhone 6s & iPhone 6s Plus

If your device is struggling on iOS 14, or you’re leery about upgrading, you won’t have to wait long for Apple’s first batch of bug fixes.

Apple recently told CNET that it is “aware of an issue that can impact default email and browser settings in iOS 14 and iPadOS 14 and that a “fix will be available to users in a software update.” It didn’t call a version out by name.

The company recently confirmed an iOS 14.2 update and there’s also been chatter about an iOS 14.1 release alongside the iPhone 12 series in October. We could also see a fast iOS 14.0.1 release.

One way or another, we should see a new version of iOS 14 roll out soon and that’s great news for those of you looking to squash bugs or performance issues.

iPhone 6s iOS 14 Jailbreak

Developers have released an iOS 13 jailbreak tool that’s compatible with iOS 13.5 and older versions of iOS 13. However, we haven’t seen anything for iOS 14.

Earlier this year the developers behind the “unc0ver” jailbreaking tool released version 5.0.0. It’s compatible with iOS 13.5 and most versions of iOS that fall between iOS 13.5 and iOS 11.0.

It doesn’t work with iOS 12.3-12.3.2, iOS 12.4.2-12.4.5, or iOS 13.7-iOS 13.5.1. It doesn’t work with the current version of iOS 14 either.

We don’t know when or even if we’ll see a public iOS 14 jailbreak tool so keep your eyes peeled for new information as we push deeper into the month.

For more on the iOS 13 jailbreak, head here.

4 Reasons Not to Install iOS 14 & 11 Reasons You Should

Install iOS 14 for Better Security

Install iOS 14 for Better Security

If security is important to you, think about installing the iOS 14 update right away.

iOS 14 brings 11 new security patches to your iPhone. If you're interested in the exact nature of these improvements, you can read about them over on Apple's website.

If you skipped iOS 13.7 or any older versions of iOS 13, you'll get the security patches from those updates with your iOS 14 update. 

In addition to those patches, iOS 14 comes with some security and privacy upgrades including improvements to Home/HomeKit and Safari. 

For instance in Safari, you can now tap the Privacy Report button to better understand how websites handle your privacy.

With iOS 14 on board you can now get information on the App Store that will help you understand the privacy practices of apps before you download them. 

There is also a new recording indicator that will appear at the top of your screen whenever an app is using your microphone or camera. You can see if an app has used them recently in Control Center.

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Android

Samsung Galaxy Android 11 Update Info (2020)

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With the official Android 11 roll out from Google underway, we want to take you through everything you should know right now Samsung’s plans for Galaxy phones and tablets.

In September, Google pushed its next operating system, Android 11, to Pixel users. That’s huge news for the Pixel community and it’s also big news for those who own other Android-powered devices. It means an official release is getting closer for those phones and tablets.

With Android 11 rolling out and Samsung’s Android 10 roll out slowing down, Galaxy smartphone and tablet users are starting to think about the future.

While some Android OEMs started talking about Android 11 months ago, Samsung remained silent. That changed after the launch of the Galaxy Note 20.

Samsung’s confirmed early Android 11 plans. And thanks to that information along with rumors and traditions, we can put together an overview for those of you curious about Android 11.

In this guide we’re going to take you through what you should know about Android 11 if you currently own, or if you’re planning to buy a Galaxy S20, Galaxy Note 20, Galaxy Note 10, Galaxy S10, Galaxy Note 9, Galaxy S9, Galaxy S8, Galaxy Note 8, or another Galaxy device.

We’ll take you through what we know about Samsung’s version of Android 11. We’ll take you through what we know about the release date and we’ll outline which devices will get an upgrade to the new version of Android.

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Let’s start with what’s coming out before the official version of Android 11. Samsung is still rolling out Android 10 updates and it’s also pushing monthly updates to its stable of Galaxy phones and tablets.

Samsung Galaxy September Update

Samsung’s September update is pushing out right now.

The update is rolling out to the Galaxy S10, Galaxy S10+, Galaxy S10e, Galaxy Note 10, Galaxy Note 10+, Galaxy S9, Galaxy S9+, Galaxy Note 9, Galaxy Note 8, Galaxy A70, Galaxy A50, Galaxy A21s, Galaxy M01s, Galaxy M31, Galaxy Tab S5e, Galaxy Tab Active Pro, and Galaxy Tab S6 and you can expect it to hit more devices in the near future.

The company’s September update includes a ton of patches including 15 fixes that are for issues related to Samsung’s own software.

If you own a Galaxy Tab S6, your upgrade should include software features from the new Galaxy Tab S7. Namely, Wireless DeX and the ability to request Wi-Fi passwords from people on your network if they’re in your contacts list.

If you want to learn more about Samsung’s September security update, head on over to the company’s website.

As a reminder, here’s the current breakdown of Samsung’s current Android security update coverage:

Current Models for Monthly Security Updates

  • Galaxy Fold, Galaxy Z Fold2, Galaxy Z Fold2 5G, Galaxy Z Flip, Galaxy Z Flip 5G
  • Galaxy S9, Galaxy S9+, Galaxy S10, Galaxy S10+, Galaxy S10e, Galaxy S10 5G, Galaxy S10 Lite, Galaxy S20, Galaxy S20 5G, Galaxy S20+, Galaxy S20+ 5G, Galaxy S20 Ultra, Galaxy S20 Ultra 5G
  • Galaxy Note8, Galaxy Note9, Galaxy Note10, Galaxy Note10 5G, Galaxy Note10+, Galaxy Note10+ 5G, Galaxy Note10 Lite, Galaxy Note20, Galaxy Note20 5G, Galaxy Note20 Ultra, Galaxy Note20 Ultra 5G
  • Enterprise Models: Galaxy A8 (2018), Galaxy A50, Galaxy XCover4s, Galaxy XCover FieldPro, Galaxy XCover Pro

Current Models for Quarterly Security Updates

  • Galaxy S8, Galaxy S8+, Galaxy S8 Active
  • Galaxy A2 Core, Galaxy A5 (2017), Galaxy A7 (2018), Galaxy A8s, Galaxy A9 (2018)
  • Galaxy A10, Galaxy A10e, Galaxy A10s, Galaxy A20, Galaxy A20e, Galaxy A20s, Galaxy A30, Galaxy A30s, Galaxy A40, Galaxy A50s, Galaxy A60, Galaxy A70, Galaxy A70s, Galaxy A80, Galaxy A90 5G
  • Galaxy A01, Galaxy A01 Core, Galaxy A11, Galaxy A21, Galaxy A21s, Galaxy A31, Galaxy A41, Galaxy A51, Galaxy A51 5G, Galaxy A71, Galaxy A71 5G
  • Galaxy J4+, Galaxy J4 Core, Galaxy J6+
  • Galaxy M10, Galaxy M10s, Galaxy M20, Galaxy M30, Galaxy M30s, Galaxy M40
  • Galaxy M01, Galaxy M11, Galaxy M21, Galaxy M31, Galaxy M31s, Galaxy M51
  • Galaxy Tab A 10.1 (2019), Galaxy Tab A 8 (2019), Galaxy Tab A 8 Plus (2019), Galaxy Tab A 8.4 (2020), Galaxy Tab A7, Galaxy Tab Active2, Galaxy Tab Active Pro
  • Galaxy Tab S5e, Galaxy Tab S6, Galaxy Tab S6 5G, Galaxy Tab S6 Lite, Galaxy Tab S7, Galaxy Tab S7+, Galaxy View2
  • W20 5G

Current Models for Other Regular Security Updates

  • Galaxy S8 Lite, Galaxy Note FE
  • Galaxy A3 (2017), Galaxy A6, Galaxy A6+, Galaxy A7 (2017), Galaxy A8+ (2018), Galaxy A8 Star
  • Galaxy J2 Core, Galaxy J3 (2017), Galaxy J3 Pop, Galaxy J3 Top, Galaxy J4, Galaxy J5 (2017), Galaxy J5 Prime, Galaxy J6, Galaxy J7 (2017), Galaxy J7 Duo, Galaxy J7 Prime, Galaxy J7 Prime2, Galaxy J7 Pop, Galaxy J7 Top, Galaxy J7 Max, Galaxy J7 Neo, Galaxy J7+, Galaxy J8
  • Galaxy Tab A (2017), Galaxy Tab A 10.5 (2018), Galaxy Tab S3, Galaxy Tab S4, Galaxy Tab E 8 Refresh

So while devices like the Galaxy S9 and Galaxy Note 9 probably won’t get Android 11, they will get security patches and bug fixes for the foreseeable future.

The company’s pushed One UI 2.1, the interface that arrived on board the Galaxy S20 series, to a number of devices including the Galaxy S10, Galaxy Note 10, Galaxy Fold, Galaxy Tab S6, Galaxy Tab S5e, Galaxy Tab S4, Galaxy A51, Galaxy S9, Galaxy S9+, Galaxy Note 9, Galaxy M01s, and Galaxy M31.

These updates brought a variety of changes including:

  • Quick Share
  • Music Share
  • Single Take
  • AR Zone
  • Pro Video Recording

That said, the One UI 2.1 update for older devices was missing at least one feature that’s present on Galaxy S20 models: Bixby Routines.

The company’s also released another version of One UI, dubbed One UI 2.5, that brings a number of improvements to Galaxy devices. The software debuted on board the Galaxy Note 20.

Samsung is pushing One UI 2.5 to the Galaxy S20, Galaxy S20+, Galaxy S20 Ultra, Galaxy Z Flip, Galaxy Note 10, Galaxy Note 10+, Galaxy Note 10 Lite, Galaxy S10, Galaxy S10+, Galaxy S10e, Galaxy S10 Lite, and Galaxy Tab S6 with more releases on the way.

The company is also planning to bring One UI 2.5 to the Galaxy S9, Galaxy S9+, Galaxy Note 9, and Galaxy Fold. It’s unclear when these updates will roll out.

One UI 2.5 is a fairly minor update, but it does bring a few notable changes including the ability for your device to remember the angle you used for your last selfie.

The camera app will also remember the last shooting mode you used (video, etc). There’s also support for full-screen navigation gestures in third-party launchers.

Samsung Galaxy Android 11: What’s New

Samsung’s version of Android 11 will look a lot different than the version Google releases for Pixel devices because it will utilize the company’s new One UI 3.0 user interface.

While we have some information, we don’t have the full picture because Samsung’s version of Android 11 is still in development. That said, it should bring a lot of Google’s features with it.

Google’s version of Android 11 includes features like:

  • Improved Quick Replies.
  • Mute notification sounds & vibrations during video capture recording.
  • Chat Bubbles.
  • Native Screen Recording.
  • Bluetooth improvements for headphones.
  • Memory Input/Output improvements.
  • Biometric Authentication Strength
  • Low Latency support.
  • Variable refresh rates.
  • Resume on Reboot.
  • And a whole lot more.

You can learn more about Android 11 on Google’s website.

As for Samsung’s version of Android 11 with One UI 3.0, we now have a full change log thanks to the company’s beta program.

As expected, the software is loaded up with changes. Here’s the first Galaxy Android 11/One UI 3.0 change log from the beta, courtesy of XDA-Developers:

Home screen

  • Touch and hold an app to add an associated widget.
  • Turn the screen off by double-tapping on an empty are of the Home screen. You can turn this on in Settings > Advanced features > Motion and gestures.

Lock screen

  • Dynamic Lock screen now has more categories,, and you can select more than one.
  • Lock screen widgets are improved.

Quick panel

  • See your conversations and media more conveniently in their own sections when you swipe down from the top of the screen.

AOD

  • Always On Display widgets are improved.

Accessibility

  • Get quick access to the most important accessibility settings during device setup.
  • Get recommended accessibility features based on what you use.
  • Set the Accessibility shortcut more easily in settings.
  • Sound detectors now work with your SmartThings devices such as TVs and lights to give you more visible alerts when the doorbell rings or a baby is crying.

Samsung Keyboard

  • You can find the keyboard in settings more easily under General management in Settings, and the settings have been reorganized to put the most important ones first.

Samsung DeX

  • You can now connect to supported TVs wirelessly.
  • New touchpad multi-gestures let you change screen zoom and font size more easily.

Internet

  • Added ability to block websites from redirecting you when you tap the Back button.
  • Added warnings and blocking options for websites that shot too many pop-ups or notifications.
  • Rearranged menus to make things easier to find.
  • Added several new add-ons, including one that translates websites.
  • Added option hide the status bar for a more immersive browsing experience.
  • Increased maximum number of open tabs to 99.
  • Added ability to lock and reorder tabs.
  • Improved design for tab bar which is now supported on all devices.
  • Ended support for Samsung Internet edge panel.

Contacts & Phone

  • Added the ability to edit multiple linked contacts at one time.
  • Added an option to help you quickly delete duplicate contacts.
  • Enhanced the search experience.
  • Extended the storage period of the Trash bin from 15 to 30 days.

Phone/Call background

  • Added the ability to customize the call screen with your own pictures and videos.

Messages

  • Created a Trash bin to store recently deleted messages.

Call & Text on other devices

  • Added the ability to turn Call & text on other devices on or off with Bixby Routines.

Calendar

  • Events with the same start time are now shown together in month and agenda view.
  • Reorganized options for adding and editing events.
  • Improved layout for full screen alerts.

Reminder

  • Improved layout for full screen alerts

Digital wellbeing and Parental controls

  • Added trends to your weekly report. You can see how your usage has changed since the previous week and check your usage time for each feature.
  • Added phone usage time while driving to the weekly report.
  • Added a lock screen widget so you can check your screen time without unlocking your phone.
  • Added separate profiles for personal and work modes so you can track your screen time separately.

Camera

  • Improved auto-focus and auto exposure functionality and usability.
  • Improved stabilization when taking pictures of the moon at high zoom levels.

Photo editor

  • Added the ability to revert edited pictures back to their original versions.

Bixby Routine

  • Grouped preset routines help you get started quickly and learn how to build your own routines easily.
  • You can now see what actions are reversed when a routine ends.
  • New conditions have been added, such as a specific start time, the disconnection of a Bluetooth device or Wi-Fi network, a call from a specific number, and more.
  • New actions have been added, including talking to Bixby and accessibility actions.
  • You can add a customized icon for each routine and add routines to the Lock screen for quick access.

The software is a work in progress and there’s always a chance Samsung adds, or subtracts, features from this list as the beta progresses.

For instance, Google’s smart home controls are reportedly missing from the pre-beta software, but we could see them added into the final version of the software. Time will tell.

Samsung’s also working on the software that will power the upcoming Galaxy S21 series. The firmware was, as expected, is based on Android 11.

We don’t know what the software will look like, but the devices will almost certainly be powered by a new version of One UI, probably dubbed One UI 3.1.

These Galaxy Devices Will Get Android 11

Samsung typically keeps devices updated with major Android software updates for two years. Fortunately, it looks like the company will change this policy for Android 11.

The company says it’s committed to providing three years of major software upgrades going forward. This is obviously a huge development.

Initially it looked like this might only apply to higher profile devices, but according to Samsung, lengthier support will also be extended to other devices.

Here’s the full list:

  • Galaxy S series: Galaxy S20 Ultra 5G, Galaxy S20 Ultra, Galaxy S20+ 5G, Galaxy S20+, Galaxy S20 5G, Galaxy S20 in addition to Galaxy S10 5G, Galaxy S10+, Galaxy S10, Galaxy S10e, Galaxy S10 Lite and upcoming S series devices.
  • Galaxy Note series: Galaxy Note 20 Ultra 5G, Galaxy Note 20 Ultra, Galaxy Note 20 5G, Galaxy Note 20, Galaxy Note 10+ 5G, Galaxy Note 10+, Galaxy Note 10 5G, Galaxy Note 10, Galaxy Note 10 Lite and upcoming Note series devices.
  • Galaxy Foldable devices: Galaxy Z Fold 2 5G, Galaxy Z Fold 2, Galaxy Z Flip 5G, Galaxy Z Flip, Galaxy Fold 5G, Galaxy Fold and upcoming Z series devices
  • Galaxy A series: Galaxy A71 5G, Galaxy A71, Galaxy A51 5G, Galaxy A51, Galaxy A90 5G and select upcoming A series devices.
  • Tablets: Galaxy Tab S7+ 5G, Galaxy Tab S7+, Galaxy Tab S7 5G, Galaxy Tab S7, Galaxy Tab S6 5G, Galaxy Tab S6, Galaxy Tab S6 Lite and upcoming Tab S series devices.

As for Android 11, Popular phones like the Galaxy S20, Galaxy S20+, Galaxy S20 Ultra, Galaxy S10Galaxy S10+Galaxy S10e, Galaxy Fold, Galaxy Note 10 are shoo-ins. The Galaxy Note 20 will make the move to Android 11 as well.

As for the company’s tablets, the Galaxy Tab S6 and Galaxy Tab A 10.1 (2019) will get upgraded to Android 11. You can also expect the new Galaxy Tab S7 to get upgraded as well.

Mid-range phones and tablets from 2019 should also move from Android 10 to Android 11.

Here is a preliminary list of device we think will get upgraded to Android 11 in 2020 and 2021:

  • Galaxy S20
  • Galaxy S20+
  • Galaxy S20 Ultra
  • Galaxy Note 20
  • Galaxy S10
  • Galaxy S10 5G
  • Galaxy S10+
  • Galaxy S10e
  • Galaxy S10 Lite
  • Galaxy Note 10
  • Galaxy Note 10 Lite
  • Galaxy Fold
  • Galaxy Z Flip
  • Galaxy Z Fold 2
  • Galaxy A10
  • Galaxy A10e
  • Galaxy A10s
  • Galaxy A11
  • Galaxy A20
  • Galaxy A20e
  • Galaxy A20s
  • Galaxy A21
  • Galaxy A21s
  • Galaxy A30
  • Galaxy A30s
  • Galaxy A31
  • Galaxy A40
  • Galaxy A41
  • Galaxy A50
  • Galaxy A50s
  • Galaxy A51
  • Galaxy A60
  • Galaxy A70
  • Galaxy A70s
  • Galaxy A71
  • Galaxy A80
  • Galaxy A8s
  • Galaxy M01
  • Galaxy M11
  • Galaxy M21
  • Galaxy M30s
  • Galaxy M31
  • Galaxy M40
  • Galaxy Tab S7
  • Galaxy Tab S6
  • Galaxy Tab S6 Lite
  • Galaxy Tab S5e
  • Galaxy Tab Active Pro
  • Galaxy Tab A 10.1 (2019)
  • Galaxy Tab A 8 (2019)
  • Galaxy Tab A 8 Plus (2019)
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These Galaxy Devices Might Not Get Android 11

Any Galaxy device that’s not on that list is currently on the fence when it comes to Android 11. That means popular devices like the Galaxy Note 9 and Galaxy S9 series are very much in danger of getting left behind on Android 10.

Here are a few Samsung Galaxy devices that could stick around on Android 10:

  • Galaxy S9
  • Galaxy S9+
  • Galaxy Note 9
  • Galaxy A9 (2018)
  • Galaxy A8 (2018)
  • Galaxy A8+ (2018)
  • Galaxy A7 (2018)
  • Galaxy A6 (2018)
  • Galaxy A6+ (2018)
  • Galaxy Tab A 10.5 (2018)

Older models like Galaxy S8 and Galaxy Note 8 probably won’t get upgraded to Android 11 either. Neither device has been upgraded to Android 10.

Samsung Galaxy Android 11 Beta

Google’s Android 11 beta included the Pixel 2, Pixel 2 XL, Pixel 3, Pixel 3 XL, Pixel 3a, Pixel 3a XL, Pixel 4, Pixel 4 XL, and the Pixel 4a.

Other companies that took part in the Android 11 beta included OnePlus (OnePlus 8 series), Xiomi (Mi 10, Mi 10 Pro, and the POCO F2 Pro), and OPPO (Find X2 and Find X2 Pro).

As for Samsung, it will host its own Android 11 beta for Galaxy devices.

The company has launched its Android 11 beta program. The program has started in the pre-release phase which requires users to register to become a Samsung developer partner. You can do that over on its website.

Samsung’s Android 11 pre-beta is limited to Galaxy S20, Galaxy S20+, and Galaxy S20 Ultra models in South Korea and the United States, but the company will open the beta up to users in China, Germany, India, Poland, and the United Kingdom once the pre-beta process ends.

As for the start of the public Android 11 beta, it looks like it could happen soon. An update for the company’s Samsung’s Galaxy Wearable app includes support for Android 11.

Samsung used to keep its Android betas exclusive to its Galaxy S flagship models. In 2016, the Android Nougat beta was exclusive to Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 Edge users. In 2017, Samsung limited the Android Oreo beta to the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+.

It took a different approach with Android Pie. Instead of keeping it limited to Galaxy S flagships, Samsung expanded the Android Pie/One UI beta to former flagships and mid-range devices. The Android 10 beta reverted back to the old days with a far more limited release.

While we don’t know how the Android 11 beta will work exactly, you can expect the Galaxy Note 20 to take part at some point. We also expect to see a release for Galaxy S10 and Galaxy Note 10 models down the road.

For more on the Samsung Galaxy Android 11 beta program, take a look at our guide.

Samsung Galaxy Android 11 Release Date

So when will Samsung release its first Android 11 update? Let’s start with what we know.

Now that the Galaxy Android 11 beta program is live, we know that the company is hard at work on updates for the Galaxy S20, Galaxy S20+, and Galaxy S20 Ultra.

The Galaxy S20+ Android 11 update recently appeared in a benchmark on HTML5test which is a sign that testing is underway behind the scenes. The device being tested was running the company’s unreleased Samsung Internet 13.0.

The company is reportedly testing Android 11 on the Galaxy S10+. Earlier this year the device showed up in a Geekbench benchmark.

Last year, Samsung pushed its first public Android 10 beta in October, or, several weeks after Google pushed the official version of Android 10 to Pixel devices. With the official version of Android 11 out for Pixel devices, the public beta is getting close.

Samsung says the Galaxy S20 series will be the first to Android 11 and we expect the Galaxy Note 20 series to follow closely behind. These devices will followed by older models like the Galaxy S10 and Galaxy Note 10.

And while a lot of Galaxy models will probably get Android 11 in the second half 2020, many others will have to wait until 2021. Samsung’s Android roll outs typically span across several months.

We’ll continue to update this post with new information as the year goes on so make sure to check back in with us.

5 Reasons to Wait for the Galaxy S21 & 5 Reasons Not To

Wait for Even Better Performance

Wait for Even Better Performance

You can expect the Galaxy S21 series to build on the foundation left by the Galaxy S20 series and the Galaxy Note 20 series

A sketchy report out of China claims Samsung will utilize the Snapdragon 865 inside the Galaxy S21 to keep the price down. 

That said, there's also a chance the Galaxy S21 makes the jump to Qualcomm's rumored Snapdragon 875 processor. If true, that should lead to notable improvements in overall speed, multitasking, and battery life. 

91Mobiles has released potential information about Qualcomm's new processor. It will supposedly include a new X60 5G modem and an Adreno 660 graphics processor.

Unfortunately, the report doesn't shed any light on how much it'll improve upon the Snapdragon 865. We probably won't get those details until much later this year.

Another processor rumor hints at a new Exynos 1000 processor for the upcoming Galaxy S21 Ultra and an Exynos 991 or or Exynos 992 for the cheapest Galaxy S21 model.

The Exynos 1000 is reportedly codenamed "Olympus" and the "Exynos 1000" moniker is currently a tenative name. 

Leaker Ice Universe says the Exynos 1000 will still "lose" to the Snapdragon 875, he says power consumption should be improved. 

The company is also reportedly thinking about ditching the Exynos name for its in-house processors.  

The Galaxy S20's 120Hz screens are extremely smooth, but they can drain battery life and the hope is that Samsung's improvements to next year's models will help tone that down. The Galaxy S20 represents Samsung's first stab at the technology. 

The Galaxy S20's 5G connectivity can also have a heavy impact on battery life and bringing a new modem aboard the Galaxy S21 could help counteract that.

As for the size of the Galaxy S21's battery, Samsung-centric blog Galaxy Club has spotted information about its size. 

The information points to a 4,660mAh capacity battery. The Galaxy S20's battery is rated at 4,370mAh so this would represent a small bump. 

The same site has also leaked the Galaxy S20 Ultra's battery capacity. According to Galaxy Club, the Galaxy S21 Ultra battery is rated at 4,885 mAh which means it could be marketed as 5,000 mAh.

So if you want a high-end Galaxy phone, but think you might want a little more polish, consider hanging around for next year's flagships. 

Last update on 2020-09-20. This post may contain affiliate links. Click here to read our disclosure policy for more details. Images via Amazon API

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Apple

iPadOS 14 Problems: 5 Things You Need to Know

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The iPadOS 14 beta squashed a good number of bugs, but issues are present in the first official version of the new operating system.

At long last iPadOS 14 is available for iPad. The software is compatible with all iPad, iPad mini, iPad Air, and iPad Pro models capable of running iPadOS 13.

While much of the talk is about iPadOS 14’s new features, the new software also has numerous under-the-hood improvements on board and some iPad users are noticing a big difference in performance after making the jump.

A lot of the feedback about iPadOS 14 is good, but we’re also hearing about some of the early issues plaguing the firmware. Some of these problems are brand new, others have carried over from iPadOS 13.

In this guide to iPadOS 14 problems we’ll take you through the current state of the software. We’ll show you where to find potential fixes for the most common iPadOS 14 problems and provide you with some resources that could help if you do happen to run into trouble.

We’ll also touch on the state of the iPadOS 13 downgrade and outline what you can expect from Apple and iPadOS 14 down the road.

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iPadOS 14 Problems

iPad mini, iPad Pro, iPad Air, and iPad users are complaining about a variety of bugs and performance issues including some that appear every time Apple releases a new operating system.

The early list of iPadOS 14 problems includes download and installation problems, UI lag, crashes, issues with first and third-party apps, Face ID problems, Wi-Fi issues, and Bluetooth issues.

iPadOS 14 lets users set third-party applications as alternatives to the company’s default mail and browser apps. However, iPad users have discovered that the software reverts these apps to Apple’s whenever a device is restarted. Fortunately, Apple is working on a fix.

The company recently told CNET that it is “aware of an issue that can impact default email and browser settings in iOS 14 and iPadOS 14 and that a “fix will be available to users in a software update.”

If you haven’t downloaded iPadOS 14 yet, we recommend preparing yourself, and your iPad, for the move. A little prep work ahead of time could help you avoid major headaches.

We’ve put together a step-by-step pre-installation process and it will help you get ready for the installation.

Where to Find Feedback

If you’re currently running iPadOS 13 and you’re feeling leery about the move to iPadOS 14, you’ll want to dig into feedback from early adopters.

We also recommend digging around on YouTubeApple’s discussion forums, social media sites like Twitter/Facebook, and the MacRumors forums for additional feedback about the update’s performance.

We’ve also released our list of reasons to, and not to, make the jump to iPadOS 14.

How to Fix iPadOS 14 Problems

Before you contact Apple, have a look at our list of fixes for the most common Apple software problems. You might find the fix you’ve been looking for.

We’ve also released a list of tips that could help you improve your device’s performance and a guide that will show you how to fix  battery life problems.

If you can’t find a fix in those guides, head on over to Apple’s discussion forums. If you don’t find what you’re looking for there, you might want to get in contact with Apple Support via Twitter or via the the company’s website.

If nothing works, you’ll probably want to make an appointment to see a Genius at your local Apple Store if it’s open.

You Can Downgrade from iPadOS 14

If you can’t stand the iPadOS 14 update’s performance on your iPad, you can try downgrading back to iPadOS 13.

Apple is currently signing on iPadOS 13.7 which means you can use a loophole and bring your iPad’s software back if you think it could help improve performance.

Unfortunately, Apple’s no longer signing on iPadOS 13.6.1 or any older versions of iPadOS which means there’s no way back to those updates.

For more about how the downgrade process works, take a look at our detailed walkthrough.

What’s Next

If you’re struggling on iPadOS 14, or you’re nervous about upgrading to Apple’s new operating system, you might want to wait for Apple’s first batch of bug fixes for iPadOS 14 problems.

Apple is currently working on iPadOS 14.2, a new milestone update. The update is currently in beta and it should carry new features and bug fixes.

We don’t have an iPadOS 14.2 release date to look forward to just yet. If you can’t wait for the official release you can download the beta.

There’s a good chance we see another version of iPadOS 14 (iPadOS 14.0.1 or iPadOS 14.1) roll out sooner than iPadOS 14.2 so keep an eye out as we push toward the end of the month.

For more on iPadOS 14.2, take a look at our guide.

4 Reasons Not to Install iPadOS 14 & 11 Reasons You Should

Install iPadOS 14 for Better Security

Install iPadOS 14 for Better Security

If security is important to you, and it should be, think about installing iPadOS 14 right now. 

iPadOS 14 has 11 new security patches on board. If you're interested in the exact nature of these improvements, you can read about them over on Apple's website

If you skipped iPadOS 13.7 or any older versions of iPadOS 13, you'll get the security patches from those updates with your upgrade. They're baked in.

In addition to those patches, iPadOS 14 comes with some security and privacy upgrades including improvements to Home/HomeKit and Safari. 

For instance in Safari, you can now tap the Privacy Report button to better understand how websites handle your privacy.

With iPadOS 14 on board you can now get information on the App Store that will help you understand the privacy practices of apps before you download them. 

There is also a new recording indicator that will appear at the top of your screen whenever an app is using your microphone or camera. You can see if an app has used them recently in Control Center.

Last update on 2020-09-20. This post may contain affiliate links. Click here to read our disclosure policy for more details. Images via Amazon API

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5 Things to Know About the iPadOS 14.2 Update

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Apple’s confirmed a new iPadOS 14.2 update and the firmware is currently in beta ahead of a release for iPadiPad ProiPad Air, and iPad mini.

iPadOS 14.2 is a milestone upgrade (x.x) for iPadOS which means it should bring a mix of new features and under-the-hood improvements to Apple’s new operating system.

iPadOS 14.2’s arrival came as a bit of a surprise because Apple hasn’t confirmed iPadOS 14.1 yet. There’s a chance iPadOS 14.2 serves as iPadOS 14.0’s successor, but we should see another version of iPadOS 14 arrive before it.

iPad users who don’t want to wait for the official iPadOS 14.2 release don’t have to. The iPadOS 14.2 update is available to try right now via Apple’s beta program.

With iPadOS 14.2 confirmed, we want to take you through everything there is to know about the firmware.

In this guide to iPadOS 14.2 we’ll take you through the update’s known changes, what you can expect from the iPadOS 14.2 release date and release time, key information about the iPadOS 14.2 beta, and more.

iPadOS 14.2 Beta

If you can’t wait for the official release you can download an early version of the iPadOS 14.2 update right now.

Apple’s pushed an iPadOS 14.2 beta to developers. We expect it to release a beta to those enrolled in the Beta Software Program, but it’s unclear when that will happen.

The company’s Beta Software Program is free to anyone with a working Apple ID.

Before you download the iPadOS 14.2 beta on your tablet remember that pre-release software is almost always plagued with bugs and performance issues.

These issues could impact the performance of your core apps, your device’s battery life, and its overall speed which makes the software less than ideal for a daily driver.

You should be able to fix some of these problems on your own, but some bugs and performance problems will probably require a fix from Apple in a future beta or in the official release.

If you can’t stand the beta’s performance you can downgrade back to older software though Apple is only signing on iPadOS 14.0 and iPadOS 13.7. The downgrade path to other updates is closed.

iPadOS 14.2 Release Date

Apple hasn’t confirmed a iPadOS 14.2 release date.

Nothing is confirmed, but the company is reportedly planning to launch iOS 14.1 alongside the new iPhone 12 series in October.  The iPhone 12 launch is expected to take place sometime during the first half of the month.

If that pans out, Apple could release iOS 14.1/iPadOS 14.1 shortly before they arrive on shelves with the iPadOS 14.2 release coming sometime later.

We could also see the iPadOS 14.1 update drop first followed by an iPadOS 14.2 release alongside the new iPhones in late October.

Apple recently told CNET that it is “aware of an issue that can impact default email and browser settings in iOS 14 and iPadOS 14 and that a “fix will be available to users in a software update.”

Given the nature of the bug, we could see a new version of iPadOS 14 (perhaps iPadOS 14.0.1 or iPadOS 14.1) roll out before iPadOS 14.2 arrives.

We’ll let you know when we learn more.

iPadOS 14.2 Release Time

The iPadOS 14.2 release date isn’t known, but we know exactly when Apple will roll the software out on release day.

The official version of iPadOS 14.2 will probably arrive in and around 10AM Pacific. It sometimes takes a few minutes for software updates to show up so don’t be surprised if your update appears after the clock strikes 10AM.

Apple will also release iPadOS 14.2 beta updates in and around 10AM Pacific. The company typically releases new beta updates every 1-2 weeks.

Here’s what you can expect from the iPadOS 14.2 release time in other U.S. timezones:

  • Eastern – 1 PM
  • Central – 12 PM
  • Mountain – 11AM

Keep these times in mind if you plan to install new iPadOS 14.2 betas, or the official version of iPadOS 14.2, right away.

iPadOS 14.2 Update: What’s New

Apple’s x.x updates always bring a mix of features, security patches, and under-the-hood improvements and that’s what you can expect from iPadOS 14.2.

Developers digging through the first iPadOS 14.2 beta have discovered a new Music Recognition control for Control Center. The feature will let users discover music around them.

Apple could add, or subtract, from the iPadOS 14.2 change log as the beta progresses so keep an eye out for changes as the software makes progress behind the scenes.

iPadOS 14.2 Jailbreak

If you still jailbreak, make sure you avoid the iPadOS 14.2 beta. The only way you can jailbreak a device right now is if it’s running an older version of iPadOS 13 or iOS 12.

We don’t expect them to release a tool that’s compatible with the iPadOS 14.2 beta.

4 Reasons Not to Install iPadOS 14 & 11 Reasons You Should

Install iPadOS 14 for Better Security

Install iPadOS 14 for Better Security

If security is important to you, and it should be, think about installing iPadOS 14 right now. 

iPadOS 14 has 11 new security patches on board. If you're interested in the exact nature of these improvements, you can read about them over on Apple's website

If you skipped iPadOS 13.7 or any older versions of iPadOS 13, you'll get the security patches from those updates with your upgrade. They're baked in.

In addition to those patches, iPadOS 14 comes with some security and privacy upgrades including improvements to Home/HomeKit and Safari. 

For instance in Safari, you can now tap the Privacy Report button to better understand how websites handle your privacy.

With iPadOS 14 on board you can now get information on the App Store that will help you understand the privacy practices of apps before you download them. 

There is also a new recording indicator that will appear at the top of your screen whenever an app is using your microphone or camera. You can see if an app has used them recently in Control Center.

Last update on 2020-09-20. This post may contain affiliate links. Click here to read our disclosure policy for more details. Images via Amazon API

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This article may contain affiliate links. Click here for more details.

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