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What do you use voice recognition for?

I just unboxed MacSpeech Dictate and posted a a quick review. I was wondering how many members of the GBM community use their voices to interact with their computers. voice recognition is nothing entirely new, but asking significant improvement over the past couple of years.

I currently have Dragon naturally speaking loaded onto my HP 2730P and I’m going to try it out on mY Viliv S5, which really isn’t designed to use as a content creation device. It is difficult to log write long documents, e-mails or articles with an on-screen keyboard, but if I can get Dragon NaturallySpeaking to work on the Viliv S5 with my JawBone 2 headset I’ll be able to use the device for “real work.”

I just used MacSpeech Dictate to have a long Skype text chat with the Sascha from netbooknews.com, to write a review and to write this quick blog post. have you tried any form of voice-recognition? If so do you actually use it on a river regular basis? I work alone, and I can’t imagine how annoying it would be to have a coworker using voice recognition all day in the cube next to you.

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10 Comments

  1. lsbeller

    06/09/2009 at 4:01 pm

    I am in outside medical device sales so I am in my car alot! I have my Fujitsu P1620 mounted in my vehicle and use the built in Windows voice recognition to dictate short email responses to coworkers and clients following sales calls. This works fairly well and allows me to keep my eyes on the road but I must say that Jott.com has been provideing a nice alternative as well.

    Steve

    Reply

  2. maati

    06/09/2009 at 5:32 pm

    I’ve been using MS Voice Command on my Windows Mobile phones for ages – in the car, or just in order to do things without taking the phone out of the pocket.

    Reply

  3. blash

    06/09/2009 at 9:10 pm

    Sorry, but why would you voice dictation for Skype? :P

    Reply

  4. Dan

    06/09/2009 at 10:02 pm

    I live by it!

    I used Dragon extensively when I was a Windows user. When I jumped to Mac two years ago I was bummed to find that the applications available were, by comparison, subpar. MacSpeech version 1 was a huge bump but version 1.5 is a HUGE!! improvement since it is built on the Dragon 10 engine.

    I’ve written about my experience with MacSpeech over on Gear Diary over the last months.

    Reply

  5. Masher

    06/09/2009 at 10:48 pm

    I have not used voice recognitiOn Much but do use my Mac’s text-to -speech feature to recd news & documents all the time.
    Voice recognition in my experience is even More error prone than Ink (handwriting recognition) and So haven It tried it much.
    By the Way, what’s a “river basis”?
    P.S. This messye wcs created using Apple’s Ink.

    Reply

    • Xavier Lanier

      06/10/2009 at 1:44 pm

      @Masher- “river basis” was what MacSpeech Dictate wrote when I said “regular basis.” :-) Obviously voice recognition has its challenges.

      Reply

  6. xyzzy

    06/10/2009 at 2:27 am

    i use a livescribe pulse, a computer inside a ballpoint pen that is used on paper and notebooks imprinted with invisible microdots. As i write, a tiny camera near the pen’s tip watches those dots go by, recording what is being
    written.
    i can jot down some notes while talking with a
    visitor. As he speaks, the digital recorder inside the pen captures his voice.
    Once done, i can tap the pen on key words i noted The pen
    immediately begins to replay the conversation, starting from the point in time of the audio recording
    the words or even pictures, any marks i make are recorded as vectors, it’s a neat gizmo, a usb dock to upload content to pc [livescribe desktop] and recharge pen,
    would work on a Viliv,

    Reply

  7. tabletenvy

    06/10/2009 at 10:57 am

    I use Dragon for medical dictation.

    I’m curious, Xavier. It sounds like you’ve had success using the Jawbone 2 headset. How does it compare to other microphone setups you’ve tried?

    Reply

    • Xavier Lanier

      06/10/2009 at 1:42 pm

      I actually can’t find my Jawbone 2 and am trying out the Jabra BT530 with the S5/Dragon. The “right” way to use Dragon is with a digital boom headset, but I was able to get through the initial training with the Jabra headset. Dragon did notify me that it had to reduce some of the command functionality because of low hardware specs, but it says it’s good to go for speech to text. I set this up last night and haven’t had a chance to use it yet though. Will give it a shot today or tomorrow.

      Reply

  8. borax99

    06/10/2009 at 12:07 pm

    Doubt Dragon will work properly on the S5 – simply not enough horsepower, it wants a dual-core proc with 1.8 GHz recommended.

    Reply

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