4 Reasons Not to Install Galaxy Note 8 Oreo & 10 Reasons You Should

The Samsung Galaxy Note 8 Oreo update is picking up speed which means it’s time to decide if you should install the upgrade when it arrives or wait a few days (or longer) to make the transition.

Samsung’s Galaxy Note 8 Android 8.0 Oreo roll out continues to make progress as we push into the month of May.

The update is rolling out to Galaxy Note 8 owners in Europe and Asia and it’s also rolling out to Galaxy Note 8 users on AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, and Verizon. We expect more Galaxy Note 8 Oreo updates to roll out as the weeks go on.

If you’ve been following the Galaxy Note 8 update’s path to release you’re probably aware of its size. Samsung’s version of Android 8.0 Oreo comes with many of Google’s base-level changes and it also brings a brand new user interface Samsung’s dubbed Experience 9.0.

The Galaxy Note 8’s Android 8.0 update is loaded up with new features, enhancements, tweaks, bug fixes, and patches. Oddly enough, it doesn’t appear to have any major upgrades for the company’s S Pen stylus.

The Samsung Galaxy Note 8 Oreo update is a major release and an operating system change can have a significant impact on your phone’s performance. While some of you might notice a performance bump, others might encounter bugs and/or performance problems.

The list of Samsung Galaxy Note 8 Oreo problems includes severe battery drain, issues with connectivity including Bluetooth and GPS, issues with apps, lag, and lock-ups. Some users have been forced to factory reset their device in order to fix their issues.

With that in mind, we want to take you through the best reasons to, and not to, install Android 8.0 Oreo on your Galaxy Note 8 right now.

If you haven’t kept up with your Galaxy Note 8’s software updates, you’re looking at a more substantial download and a much longer installation process because you’ll likely be forced to download the updates you skipped before you’re able to proceed with Oreo.

If you’re running the latest version of Android your Galaxy Note 8 Oreo update shouldn’t be more than 1.5GB. It should take you 10 minutes or less to install.

Install Android Oreo to Improve Your Note 8's Security

Install Android Oreo to Improve Your Note 8's Security

If you value your security you should probably install the Galaxy Note 8 Oreo update soon after it arrives for your device. 

Samsung continues to release important security patches each month and the Galaxy Note 8's Android 8.0 Oreo update brings the latest patches from Google and Samsung. 

The first batch of Galaxy Note 8 Oreo updates delivered Samsung's March security update, but we expect upcoming releases to come with newer security patches. Samsung recently started rolling out its April security patches. 

If you're curious about the current version, you can read more about the security patches over on Samsung's website

If you failed to download an older security update from another month, you'll get those patches when you go to install Oreo on your Galaxy Note 8 for the first time. Each update comes with important patches to protect you and your phone from harm.  

Samsung's version of Android 8.0 also comes with security improvements to Samsung Pay and enhancements to Find My Mobile.

The changes to Find My Mobile include the ability to remotely back up Secure Folder to Samsung Cloud if you lose your Galaxy Note 8 and a way to lock up Samsung Pass using Find My Mobile.

Android Oreo comes with enhancements to the device's Biometrics. Features that use biometrics like your face, fingerprints, and irises are only available when you use a secure screen lock type like a pattern, PIN, or password.

If you decide to switch to a non-secure screen lock type (Swipe or None), a Galaxy Note 8 running Android Oreo will automatically suspend biometric authentication for unlocking and for verification in apps like Samsung Pay and Samsung Pass. 

Android 8.0 Oreo also enhances the Galaxy Note 8's biometrics with additional security features. 

Features that use the Galaxy Note 8's biometrics (face, fingerprints, and irises) are now only available when you use a secure screen lock like pattern, PIN, or password.

On Oreo when you switch to a non-secure screen lock type (Swipe or None), biometric authentication is suspended for unlocking and for verification in popular apps like Samsung Pay and Samsung Pass.

One Comment

  1. Kay

    04/05/2018 at 3:47 pm

    My Sotware updated to Oreo without any Warning or Heads up.
    It Changed All of my Settings and a Bunch of other Things,
    I am Not a Happy Camper!!
    Wether it be my Provider or Samsung (or both)
    I Should have been given the Option to change or Not to change My Operating System!!

    Reply

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